Posts Tagged ‘SLR’

Weekly Update 5th – 9th July 2010

The global markets fell in the week gone by as the manufacturing growth exhibited weakness from China to U.S. The investor’s across the globe became nervous with the fading signs of global recovery. G20 leaders said that the limited demand in advanced economies has left the world reliant on emerging markets, led by China, to drive a recovery is “uneven and fragile.”

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China’s manufacturing growth slowed more than expected in June adding to the concerns that the fastest- growing major economy is cooling. The government’s Purchasing Managers’ Index declined to 52.1 from 53.9 in May. In the U.S., manufacturing slowed in June with the cooling demand from rest of the world.

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The Institute for Supply Management’s gauge of manufacturing fell to 56.2 from 59.7 a month earlier.

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As anticipated in our last two editions, RBI raised the policy rates i.e. Repurchase and Reverse Repurchase rate by 25 bps taking it to 5.50 percent and 4 percent respectively as a part of the calibrated exit from the expansionary monetary policy. The strong growth shown by manufacturing sector especially capital goods sector, acceleration in credit growth and the widening current account deficit helped RBI to take such a step in order to anchor inflationary expectations going forward. In order to address the liquidity situation which is currently in deficit mode under LAF operations, RBI allowed banks to borrow to 0.5 per cent of their net demand and time liabilities (NDTL) even in case of a shortfall in maintenance of statutory liquidity ratio (SLR) till July 16, 2010.

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The expectation of hike in policy rates by RBI was very much priced in and will not have any bearing effect on the stock markets. However expecting good monsoon, the market was in the belief that inflation will come down in the months to come. But the recent numbers from IMD suggests a relook as so far the monsoon was 16 percent below normal in June 2010.

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Indian stock markets were holding on when all the world stock markets are falling but one should be very cautious when world markets are falling so much as Banking and IT sector are showing some weakness. Nifty has support between 5200-5100 levels and Sensex between 17300-17000 levels.

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Gone was wholly a brutal week for commodities. After the fourth quarter of 2008, first time commodities witnessed quarterly decline. Even the topmost hot favorite of investors gold and dollar index toppled down as money manager’s shifted their attentions towards euro, which saw a decent rise last week. Poor economic data’s in a row further pave the path for selling. At present one should wait for the clear trend. Base metals and energy have already seen a steep decline, may trade in a range for the time being. Similar story is of gold and silver.

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Weekly Update 31st May – 4th June

Markets posted gains in the week gone by as the investors felt that stocks are battered down harshly in the short run. Buying came in Asian stocks on speculation that China will rein its effort to cool its economy as European debt crisis threatens a global recovery. Concerns also rose that the banks in Spain may face further losses after IMF urged Spain to do more to overhaul its ailing banking sector. The regulator is pushing ailing banks to merge with stronger partners.

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US Treasury Secretary Geithner said that US, China along with India, Brazil and other emerging economies are experiencing stronger recovery as compared to earlier anticipation and are positioned well to face the challenges from the European Nations. The OECD revised India’s GDP growth forecast for 2010 to 8.2% from its earlier estimate of 7.3%. It also raised the growth forecast for 2011 to 8.5% from its earlier estimate of 7.6%. The OECD also said that underlying inflationary pressures are likely to persist given the strong outlook for demand. IMF pegged India’s GDP growth forecast at 8.75% in calendar 2010 and 8.5% in calendar 2011 on expectations of strengthening of domestic demand. Back at home, RBI in order to ensure optimum liquidity in the system so that the public and private sector credit demands are met, eased credit lines for the banks.

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Banks can now borrow additional 0.5% of their net demand and time liabilities from the Central Bank under the repurchase agreement till 2 July 2010. In addition, RBI said that as an adhoc measure, banks can seek a waiver for any shortfall in maintenance of the prescribed 25% Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR) while availing the temporary facility. This step is taken by the RBI in view of the temporary liquidity pressure in the market because of the 3G auction and advance tax payments in the coming days. Talking about the much awaited Indian monsoon, the arrival is expected to be delayed by three days after tropical cyclone laila stalled its progress.

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Inspite of the big rally in last three days, overall trend of world stock markets is still down. Even the base metal commodities including Crude saw a rally but could not sustain at higher levels. Rupee which had crossed 47.70 levels intraday week came down to 46.30. Volatility is expected to remain high. Nifty faces resistance between 5100-5150 levels and Sensex between 17000-17200 levels.

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Persistent fear about the European region’s sovereign debt situation may keep buying intact in bullions. Commodity market is still volatile and jittery as crisis is still looming over EU nations. However, satisfactory first-quarter economic figures from the prominent Asian countries viz., China, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan and Malaysia will try to offset steep decline in base metals and energy complex.

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Furthermore, the week is full of event risk as well as many nations are coming with their first quarter GDP data, if any improvement occurs, it will stimulate buying in base metal and energy section. Dollar index, which is on track to give its best monthly performance since October, 2008 is likely to trade in a range in short run.

RBI’s Monetary Policy – Analyst View

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

Just an extension of our previous blog “RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance – Part 3.

 

 

Analyst View RBI policy

RBI Monetary Policies and Projections Part 4

 


In this Blog we would read the Analyst views with respect to the monetary point of view.

Analysis from the Analyst from monetary point of view:

Though there is a hike in SLR to 25 % but we think it will not have much more impact because the total investment book of commercial banks is already at 30.4% of total NDTL.

Although key rates of CRR, reverse repo and repo rates have been left unchanged, special repo facilities have been withdrawn.

Real estate loans provisioning are set to become more expensive.

NPA norms for banks have been tightened while liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in CBLO with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) will be subject to maintenance of CRR.

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The RBI is thus attempting to withdraw liquidity from areas where excess liquidity had reached a point it was more than comfortable with, while also targeting better quality management of credit.

Another point is that in the policy stance, RBI has given first priority to keep a vigil on trends in inflation and to be prepared to respond swiftly and effectively through policy adjustments to stabilize inflation expectations.

Second, it will monitor the liquidity situation closely and manage it actively to ensure that credit demands of productive sectors are adequately met while also securing price stability and financial stability.

Lastly, RBI will maintain a monetary and interest rate regime consistent with price stability and financial stability, and supportive of the growth process.

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In conclusion, it bears emphasis that the Reserve Bank is mindful of its fundamental commitment to price stability.

It will continue to monitor the price situation in its entirety and will take measures as warranted by the evolving macroeconomic conditions swiftly and effectively.

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To conclude all the factors it seems that with the withdrawal of special liquidity measures together with an imposition of CRR in borrowing in CBLO market, RBI has taken a first to step towards controlling liquidity.

 

With prioritizing inflation it is expected that the next step of RBI could hike in CRR as it has also reduced the indicative growth of Broad money to 17% from 18%.

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Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here


RBI And Its Policies – Part 1

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

However here we bring more on the RBI policies and projections.

RBI policies and projections

RBI policies and projections

 

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) laid the groundwork on Tuesday i.e. on 27th Oct in its monetary policy for a rise in interest rates by tightening credit to the commercial property sector, lifting its inflation forecast and warning of the threat of asset price bubbles.

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The RBI had injected in massive liquidity in the banking system in the past one year or so to help revive the domestic economy in the aftermath of the global financial crisis.

For now, the Reserve Bank has decided to keep the policy repo rate unchanged at 4.75 per cent, the reverse repo rate unchanged at 3.25 per cent and the (Cash Reserve Ratio) CRR of banks unchanged at 5 per cent of their (NDTL).


The following measures constitute the first phase of ‘exit’:

– The Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR), which has earlier been reduced from 25 per cent of NDTL to 24 per cent, is being restored to 25 per cent.

-The limit for export credit refinance facility, which was raised to 50 per cent of eligible outstanding export credit, is being returned to the pre-crisis level of 15 per cent.

The two unconventional refinance facilities:

(i) special refinance facility for scheduled commercial banks; and

(ii) special term repo facility for scheduled commercial banks [for funding to Mutual Funds (MFs), Non-banking Financial Companies (NBFCs), and Housing Finance Companies (HFCs)] are being discontinued with immediate effect.

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Further, the liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in Collateralized Borrowing and Lending Obligations (CBLO) with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) would now be subject to the maintenance of the CRR.

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Stay Tuned for more on this in our coming blogs.

We would cover Monetary Projections of RBI and Economy scenario and indicators at the moment.

NEWS CAPSULES

Hello Friends,

Last week witnessed lots of action with results of some major companies coupled with the RBI’s monetary policy.

Moreover, Week gone by, Indian markets turned distinctly weak as a sluggish global trend continued to cast a shadow on markets.

NEWS CAPSULES

NEWS CAPSULES

Having said that here we bring you latest updates from the Indian market and Industry.

NEWS CAPSULES

1.

A hawkish Reserve Bank of India (RBI), while staying away from hiking key rates like repo or reverse repo, hiked the statutory liquidity ratio(SLR) to 25% from 24%.

The cash reserve ratio (CRR), the minimum amount banks need to park with the RBI, was also left unchanged.

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Sun TV Network Ltd (Sun TV), owned by Kalanithi Maran, is looking at foreign partners to produce non-fiction contents.
The company joined hands with Dutch firm Endemol to launch a television game show.

3.

Tata Steel, the sixth-largest steel maker in the world, has posted a 49.49 per cent drop in net profit at Rs 902.94 crore in the second quarter, following a sharp fall in steel and ferro alloys’ prices.

Total income fell 16.46 per cent to Rs 5,692.11 crore.

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The Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group-controlled Reliance Natural Resources (RNRL) has posted a 5 per cent rise in net profit at Rs 21 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2009, against Rs 20 crore for the corresponding previous quarter.

During the quarter under review, RNRL’s total income decreased to Rs 66 crore from Rs 81 crore for the same quarter ended previous year.

The company posted an earning of Rs 0.13 per share for the quarter.

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Wipro Limited, backed by increases in price realisation, utilisation and fixed price contracts at its flagship IT services business, posted a 19 per cent increase in its net profit to Rs 1,162 crore for the second quarter ended September 30, 2009 as compared to the corresponding quarter of the previous financial year.

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United Spirits, India’s largest spirits firm, has posted a 25 per cent decline in net profit to Rs 69.6 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2009 where as the same was at Rs 94 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2008.

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Jet Airways, India’s largest private airline, reported net losses of Rs 406.69 crore for the second quarter ended September 20, down nearly 6 per cent from the same quarter last year.

The loss was mainly because of lower yield per seat following Jet’s decision to shift over half of its capacity to its low-cost service.

The shift of capacity to low-cost arm Jet Konnect was executed in May this year.

Jet Konnect fares are at least 25 per cent cheaper than full-service fares and a high load factor of 77 per cent did not offset the lower yield per passenger from cheaper fares.

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However, For More latest Industry, Gyan, Stock Market and Economy News Updates, Click here

Factors that Move the Interest Rates – Part 2 (MONETARY POLICY)

Monetary Policy

In previous Blog we have discussed about the major factors responsible for the change in interest rates and price of bonds indirectly.

All those three factors like Inflation, Currency and Liquidity have been touched upon in last blog.

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Now time to look into another major factor which causes  movement in the interest rate. The factor i am talking about is Monetary Policy. 🙂

Monetary Policy: The RBI controls liquidity largely through monetary policy instruments –

(i) CRR & SLR – CRR (Cash Reserve Ratio) refers to a portion of deposits (as cash) which banks have to maintain with the RBI.

Banks are also required to invest a portion of their deposits in government securities as a part of their SLR (Statutory Liquidity Ratio) requirements.

If either of these is increased, liquidity tightens and so interest rates harden (increase).:(

Recently, RBI has reduced both these rates to infuse liquidity in the system – CRR is 5% (down 250 bps from March ’08) and SLR is 24% (down 100 bps).

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(ii) Reverse repo rate – it is the overnight interest rate that a bank earns for lending money to the RBI in exchange for G-Secs.

A hike in reverse repo rate increases interest rates. Currently, reverse repo rate stands at 3.25%.

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(iii) Repo rate – it is the discount rate at which a central bank repurchases government securities from the commercial banks.

To temporarily expand the money supply, the central bank decreases repo rates (so that banks can swap their holdings of government securities for cash).

To contract the money supply, it increases the repo rates. The current repo rate is 4.75%.

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(iv) OMO and MSS – OMOs (Open Market Operations) are outright transactions in government securities.

When the RBI buys G-Secs, it is injecting money into the system, hence, increasing liquidity, which softens (reduces) interest rates.

When the RBI sells G-Secs, it sucks out excess money from the system i.e. reduces liquidity in the system which hardens interest rates.

MSS (Market Stabilisation Scheme) is the issuance of treasury bills and dated securities by way of auction by the RBI.

This affects interest rates in the same manner as OMOs.

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Having collected updates on where the above parameters stand, one can have a better understanding of why interest rates are at their current levels, as well as which direction they are expected to move in.

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If most of them indicate that a rise in interest rates is expected, bond prices are likely to fall in the future.

On the contrary, an expectation of a fall in interest rates means bond prices will rise.

A word of caution here though – timing interest rate changes is difficult. This is because there is a low likelihood of being able to precisely predict the movement in the factors discussed above.

So in order to minimize interest rate risk, one should ensure that the bond portfolio is diversified across various maturities.

🙂

4 Monetary Policy: The RBI controls liquidity largely through monetary policy instruments –

(i) CRR & SLR – CRR (Cash Reserve Ratio) refers to a portion of deposits (as cash) which banks have to maintain with the RBI. Banks are also required to invest a portion of their deposits in government securities as a part of their SLR (Statutory Liquidity Ratio) requirements. If either of these is increased, liquidity tightens and so interest rates harden (increase). Recently, RBI has reduced both these rates to infuse liquidity in the system – CRR is 5% (down 250 bps from March ’08) and SLR is 24% (down 100 bps).

(ii) Reverse repo rate – it is the overnight interest rate that a bank earns for lending money to the RBI in exchange for G-Secs. A hike in reverse repo rate increases interest rates. Currently, reverse repo rate stands at 3.25%.

(iii) Repo rate – it is the discount rate at which a central bank repurchases government securities from the commercial banks. To temporarily expand the money supply, the central bank decreases repo rates (so that banks can swap their holdings of government securities for cash).

To contract the money supply, it increases the repo rates. The current repo rate is 4.75%.

(iv) OMO and MSS – OMOs (Open Market Operations) are outright transactions in government securities. When the RBI buys G-Secs, it is injecting money into the system, hence, increasing liquidity, which softens (reduces) interest rates. When the RBI sells G-Secs, it sucks out excess money from the system i.e. reduces liquidity in the system which hardens interest rates. MSS (Market Stabilisation Scheme) is the issuance of treasury bills and dated securities by way of auction by the RBI. This affects interest rates in the same manner as OMOs.

Having collected updates on where the above parameters stand, one can have a better understanding of why interest rates are at their current levels, as well as which direction they are expected to move in. If most of them indicate that a rise in interest rates is expected, bond prices are likely to fall in the future. On the contrary, an expectation of a fall in interest rates means bond prices will rise. A word of caution here though – timing interest rate changes is difficult. This is because there is a low likelihood of being able to precisely predict the movement in the factors discussed above. So in order to minimize interest rate risk, one should ensure that the bond portfolio is diversified across various maturities.