Posts Tagged ‘short sellers’

Bear and Bull – Part 1

Hello Friends here we come up with our another write up on “SMC Gyan Series” 🙂

Have you all ever wondered that what exactly this Bull and Bear Market is ?

 

Bull markets and bear markets...what are they?

Bull markets and bear markets...what are they?

What are they? What do they look like? What’s the origin of this terminologies?

Lets Talk about it

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When we talk about bull and bear stock markets it reminds us that it’s a zoo out there. And, like any zoo, there are quite a few wild species to be found 😉

The first two are the bulls and the bears.

Bull market is when stock prices are climbing strongly and a Bear market is when they’re languishing.

Bear Market

To be more precisely, in finance, a bear market is a market condition that occurs when the prices of shares decline or are about to decline.

Figures may vary, but if prices decrease by 15 to 20% then the market is assumed as a bear market.

In general, a bear market resumes if the government goes into recession and if the inflation rate is high.

Bull Market

A bull market is a condition of a financial market of a group of securities in which prices are rising or are expected to rise.

The term “bull market” is most often used to refer to the stock market, but can be applied to anything that is traded, such as bonds, currencies and commodities.

Bull markets are characterized by optimism, investor confidence and expectations that strong results will continue.

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Myth About Bull and Bear Markets

One common myth is that the terms “bull market” and “bear market” are derived from the way those animals attack a foe, because bears attack by swiping their paws downward and bulls toss their horns upward.

This is a useful mnemonic, but is not the true origin of the terms.

Long ago, “bear skin jobbers” were known for selling bear skins that they did not own; i.e., the bears had not yet been caught.

This was the original source of the term “bear”.

This term eventually was used to describe short sellers, speculators who sold shares that they did not own, bought after a price drop, and then delivered the shares.

Because bull and bear baiting were once popular sports, “bulls” was understood as the opposite of “bears.” I.e., the bulls were those people who bought in the expectation that a stock price would rise, not fall.

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Stay Tuned for more on this where we would touch upon if bull and bear markets are inevitable and what are the basics investors should keep in mind while trading in bear and bull market.