Posts Tagged ‘shares’

CIL sets IPO record; to list on Nov 4

India’s IPO market created history on Thursday with state-owned Coal India share issuer in the becoming the biggest country, beating Reliance Power’s 2008 initial public offering.

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At the time of going to press, the CIL issue was subscribed 15.26 times, collecting Rs 2,36,113.28 crore. The shares will debut on the market on November 4, a day before Muhurat trading that marks Diwali.

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Responding to late rush from retail investors, the company postponed the close of the issue to 9 pm.

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At the upper end of the band, CIL will be the seventh biggest Indian company by market cap, after ONGC, State Bank of India, TCS, Reliance Industries, Infosys Technologies and NTPC, based on Thursday’s closing price. CIL’s Rs 15,474 crore IPO has overtaken Reliance Power’s Rs 11,700 crore issue.

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Buoyant demand from retail and wealthy investors on the final day added to the strong response from institutional buyers. This also signalled success for the government’s upcoming share sales.

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Retail investors, who often take cues from institutions in IPOs, had put in bids for shares 1.44 times or for 28,60,44,375 shares. Retail investors will get a five per cent discount on the final issue price.

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Wealthy individuals had separately bid for 13.89 times the shares available for them.

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Bidding for the mega IPO closed on Wednesday for qualified institutional buyers, including foreign institutional investors, mutual funds and insurance firms. And for the portion reserved for them, the issue was over subscribed by 24.70 times, lead by FIIs.

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The IPO has generated a demand of 493,38,72,050 shares from FIIs. Calculated at the upper end of the price band, this demand is worth Rs 1,20,879.86 crore and at the lower end worth Rs 1,11,012.12 crore. Even at the low end, the demand surpasses the record Rs 1.08 lakh crore pumped in by FIIs into the capital
market.

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India’s largest new issue came amid a flurry of big deals in Asia.

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At the top of its price range, Coal India would be valued at 15.7 times trailing earnings. The issue also got the highest demand for an Indian issue, helped by qualified institutional buyers.

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The demand from QIBs for CIL was at Rs 1,73,398 crore with 100 per cent application amount, compared with Rs 1,88,923 crore with 10 per cent margin for Reliance Power IPO. In case of Reliance Power, the QIB portion was covered 30.68 times.

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“The response to Coal India IPO, from all classes of investors, has surpassed even the most optimistic predictions. It has caught even the biggest optimists by surprise,” SMC Global Securities strategist Jagannadham Thunuguntla said in a note.

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He said the response puts the government on target to achieve its divestment target of Rs 40,000 crore in fiscal 2011 and even exceed it if other issues like the follow-on offering of Power Grid, Steel Authority of India, ONGC, Shipping Corporation of India, Indian Oil Corporation and IPO of Manganese Ore fall in place.

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The government, which has collected Rs 17,500 crore from public issues, including Coal India, may raise its divestment target and get over Rs 58,500 crore, SMC Capital added.

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At the upper end of price range, Coal India issue is worth Rs 15,474 crore and at the lower end it would fetch about Rs 14,211.81 crore.

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The upper band would also give it a market capitalisation of Rs 1.54 lakh crore ($34.7 billion).

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Meanwhile, the broader market recovered from a two-day slump and closed up 1.95 per cent at 20,260.58 points. Now all eyes will be on whether it will be a strong listing on the eve of Diwali.

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SPECIAL EVENTS: Series I: Open Offer

An open offer is an offer by an existing shareholder or a new shareholder of a publicly listed company, to acquire a certain number of shares from other shareholders of the target company. An open offer can either be voluntary or mandatory.

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Voluntary or Mandatory?

At any time, any entity can come out with a voluntary open offer to acquire as much number of shares of that company from other shareholders at any price which that entity is willing to offer.Whereas, if the open offer gets triggered as per the SEBI SAST guidelines (such as acquiring 15% or more stake in a company), then it is mandatory for the entity to come out with an open offer to acquire an additional minimum of 20% shares of the target company via the Open Offer route.In either of the case, the eligible shareholders, as per their discretion, may or may not tender their shares in the open offer.

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Minimum Pricing

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The price at which the mandatory open offer is to be provided cannot be below the higher of the following:

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1. Average of the weekly high and low of the closing prices of the shares of the company during the past 26 weeks.

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2. Average of the daily high and low prices of the shares of the company for the past 2 weeks.

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3. The price at which the entity coming out with an open offer acquired the shares which triggered the open offer.

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4. Price paid by the acquirer for acquisition of shares of the company, if any, by way of allotment in a public or rights or preferential issue during the past 26 weeks.

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Minimum Acceptance Ratio

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This ratio is the critical criteria in deciding the benefit that may likely accrue to the investors who tender their shares in the open offer. As the name itself suggests,minimum acceptance ratio gives us the minimum number of shares that shall be accepted in an open offer. For example, a minimum acceptance ratio of 10% means that for every 100 shares tendered by a shareholder in the open offer, a minimum of 10 shares shall be accepted in the open offer at the open offer price and rest of the90 shares shall be returned back to the shareholder after the closure of the open offer.

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The minimum acceptance ratio is calculated as follows:

It should be noted that the above figure is arrived at by assuming that all the eligible shareholders actually tender all of their shares in the open offer.

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Example: To understand the whole concept better, let us take an example.

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On September 9, 2010, Accelya Holding World S.L. (“Accelya”) agreed to buy the promoter stake of 38.60% or 56,69,478 equity shares of Kale Consultants Limited(“KCL”) at a price of `172 per equity share. This triggers the mandatory open offer as Accelya was acquiring a stake of more than 15% (i.e. 38.60%) in KCL.The mandatory open offer is for acquiring a minimum of 20% additional shares of KCL by Accelya from the shareholders of the company KCL, except the existingpromoters. This is because the shares have been acquired from the promoters itself and that event itself triggered the open offer in the first place.The open offer has to happen at a minimum price of `172, (as per SEBI pricing guidelines explained above).

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The open offer shall be for 20% additional shares of KCL that works out to 29,37,832 shares. The shares that can participate in the open offer are those which are heldby all the shareholders except the existing promoters, i.e. 61.40% ( 100% – 38.60%) of the total outstanding shares of the company. This works out to 90,19,684 shares.

 

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Hence, for every 100 shares that an investor tenders in the open offer, a minimum of 32 shares will be accepted in the open offer and rest of the 68 shares will bereturned back to the investor.

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Breakeven Price

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In the example we’ve discussed, the minimum acceptance ratio is 32.57% and the open offer price is 172. As on 8th Oct’10, the closing price of shares of KCL is151.25 on NSE. So if an investor had purchased 100 shares at that price his total outgo would be 15,125. On tendering these 100 shares, 32 shares shall be acceptedin the offer at 172, giving him an inflow of 5,504 ( 32 shares x 172). The remaining investment of the investor is 9,621 ( 15,125 – 5,504). This remaining amountneeds to recovered from the remaining 68 shares ( 100 – 32) that the investor will get back once the open offer closes. Thus, the investor will need to sell the remaining68 shares at a price of 141.49 ( 9,621 ÷ 68) to recover his original investment of 15,125. This, 141.49, is the breakeven price in this case. The investor stands to gainonly if he is able to sell his remaining 68 shares above this price, post the open offer.

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What if some shareholders do not tender their shares in the open offer?

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In our example of KCL shares, assume a certain shareholder, say Ratnabali Capital Markets Ltd (“Ratnabali“) which holds 3.48% (5,10,538) shares of the company as ofJune 30th, 2010, does not tender its shares in the open offer. This shall then improve the acceptance ratio from 32.57% to 34.53% for the other shareholders whotender their shares in the offer.

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Therefore, the number of shares accepted in the open offer shall increase to 34 (from the earlier figure of 32 in the example discussed) and accordingly, the newbreakeven price shall stand reduced from erstwhile 141.49 to 140.56.Hence, if any shareholder decides not to tender his shares in the open offer, then it becomes beneficial for the other shareholders who are indeed tendering theirshares in the open offer.

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Note:1. For the sake of simplicity, transaction costs have been ignored in the example discussed in this article.2. Prices and shareholding data sourced from National Stock Exchange.

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How To Get Started in Online Investing? Final Part

Hello Friends here we come up with an extension of our previous blog “How To Get Started in Online Investing?” Part 1.

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How To Get Started in Online Investing?

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In previous blog, we have touched upon the questions, any beginner investors do have in their mind while going for investing.

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At the same time we had also tried to look in previous blog that what is Online Trading, resources needed first of all to invest online, few steps to start investing online and how SMC ONLINE helps investors in reaping the benefits of online trading.

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In this Blog, we would try to discuss about what are the further steps an investors need to take once the initial registrations are done with.

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🙂

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Once the registration formalities are done with, you would be required to load your online investing trading account with funds.

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Once Funds would be deposited you would need to look out for the stocks on which you would like to invest prima facie.

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One thing you should bear in mind that before investing, you should do the in-depth research about the company’s profile, performances and services.

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In this respect investing firms like SMC ONLINE comes to your rescue usually by helping you with their excellent research support, stocks recommendations and quality statistics.

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These things are really very important while you invest in buying the shares of any company.

As a wise investor you should keep your eyes open, and don’t blindly trust anyone.

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Another very important thing is RISK FACTOR.

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You’ll have to take the risk in terms of investing your money in the stock market.

Stock market is a bit similar to gambling.

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But there is a big difference between the risk and calculated risk.

For a beginner, you should only go for calculated risk.

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Don’t put your entire money in terms of buying the shares of a new company, even if the future potential of that company seems very high.

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Start slowly, understand the market, earn some decent amount of money first of all and then go for big trading.

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Once you have gotten started, you should start by learning a little bit about chart reading.

If you can read the charts you will have a good idea what is going on.

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And as I said earlier, I would conclude this topic by saying that any beginner investor should look for a broker firm that gives good value for money with their commission fees.

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Stay Tuned for more and more on this 🙂

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However For More latest Industry,Stock Market and Economy News Updates, Click Here

SEBI Allows Auctions for QIBs in FPOs :)

SEBI Allows Auctions for QIBs in FPOs

Market regulator, SEBI has introduced a significant change in the way institutional bidders invest in follow-on public offers by allowing allotments through auctions.

 

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) has amended the Issue of Capital and Disclosure Requirements Regulations (ICDR) to allow pure auctions for qualified institutional investors (QIBs) in follow-on public offerings to begin with.


The method may be later extended to initial public offerings.

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Under the new method, bidders will be free to bid at any price above the floor price.

At present, allotments are made at the floor price.

Retail investors, however , will be allotted shares at the floor price.

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The board also decided that the issuer is free to place a cap either in terms of the number of shares or percentage to issued capital of the company so that a single bidder does not garner all the shares on offer, ensuring a wider distribution of shareholding.

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Jagannadham Thunuguntla, Equity Head,  SMC Capitals, said this means an institutional investor can continue to bid above the floor price and the QIB allotment will be made to the highest bidder.


“The intent is to enable companies to mop up more funds. Earlier, even when there were huge subscriptions and huge demand for an issue, the company could not get more money. This becomes more relevant in the context of the recently announced divestment plans and FPOs by the government for public sector units,” he said.

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Auction for QIBs is welcome as it would allow risk-taking entities and not just the promoters to be a part of the price discovery process, other analyst said.


A SEBI release issued after the board meeting also said the minimum market capitalisation required by listed firms to sell shares in follow-on offerings has been halved to Rs.5,000 crores  from Rs 10,000 crore.

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Moreover, the market regulator has also made it a mandatory that all listed companies would have to furnish audited or un-audited balance sheets on a half-yearly basis within 45 days from the end of the quarter instead of the current yearly basis.

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This would imply that Indian companies will be required to disclose balance sheet items.


Shareholders would be able to access the statement of assets and liabilities of the company and its solvency position on a half-yearly basis.


Shareholders would receive immense help in making informed investment decisions now and would be in better position to assess the financial health of the companies, with the implementation of this SEBI regulation of mandating frequent disclosure of the asset-liability position of companies by companies.

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Points to Remember while Selling Stocks – Part 1

Hello Friends here we come up with our another write up on “SMC Gyan Series”. 🙂


Points to remember while selling stock

Points to remember while selling stock

 

Buying a stock is simple, but Selling is actually harder as it requires regulation, understandable thoughts, and a tight rein on one’s emotions.

The ongoing optimism, slow economic revival, positive signs on the global front and high expectations from the stable government at home have forced bulls to give up their lethargic activities and to march northward.

Many investors who had seen the value of their stocks hit rock bottom and are now facing dilemma whether to sell or should they hold on? :O

Investors often face problems to take right decisions in volatile market as markets could head either way.

Wouldn’t it be disheartening if the markets rallied northwards, the day after you sold your stocks?

What if the markets come crashing down tomorrow, depriving you of the opportunity to enhance profits?

So, the decision to sell is critical.

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Some of the points when to sell your stocks:

Prima facie, if there is any drastic change in fundamental of a company, this should be the only reason to sell stock.

But a depth research has to be done before taking any decision.

Changes includes;

-restructuring of its business model,

-different business focus and directions.

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FIRST THREE POINTS :

1. Margins Crashed

Margins are the profit that a company makes on its sales.

Rising gross margins tell us that a company is reducing production costs or raising prices.

Conversely, deteriorating margins say either that production costs are increasing and the company can’t raise prices proportionally or that the company is cutting prices in an attempt to maintain marketshare.

If there are expenses related to a new product’s introduction then margins might fall for inoffensive reasons.

Falling margins, either gross or operating, often signal a declining competitive position. Thus it’s important to check both.

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2.Is There Any Drastic Change In Company’s Management?

If people in top management of the company say director or president who are liable for a company’s success begin to go away, there might be a few negative implications for the future outlook of that company as an investor.

You must look into and find out the root cause and also to see how much it could impact you.

If negative prospects, investor should sell the stock and should relocate the funds into a similar company that has stronger and more constant management.

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3. What First Fascinated You To The Stock, No Longer Applies

For example, let’s suppose that you bought a stock of a health care company because of its innovative products in the pharmaceutical field and all of a sudden, it loses a crucial patent for a life-saving medicine.

This may result in a decrease of market share in its industry, which might lead to a reduction in future profits (resulting in a decline in the value of its stock).

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Stay Tuned for more on this where we would touch upon other major points needed to keep in mind by investors before making any Buy and sell decision.

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

 

Mutual fund schemes generally boast about high dividends but mutual fund experts say picking a mutual fund scheme on the basis of its dividend payout may not be the best way to invest in the sector.

As per MF experts, comparing the quantum of dividends paid in short term is not the correct way to measure a fund’s performance.

The proportion of dividend depends on a number of factors, including the frequency of payouts over a certain period of time.

There are funds that have higher net asset value (NAVs) but lower dividends, while others have lower NAVs, higher dividends.

Moreover, many analysts believes that the consistency of dividend payout is important than the quantum of dividend.

Experts always insist investors to not to base their investment decision on the percentage of dividend paid in a short period.

Rather Investors should look for the track record of the fund in this regard over a longer period of time.

After the recent equity market bull-run, many equity funds have declared dividends up to 70 per cent.

So far in October, over a dozen of equity schemes have declared dividends.

Experts are of view that the quantum of dividend paid does not directly indicate the performance of the fund, especially in the short term.

Unlike equities, if a mutual fund scheme pays certain percentage of dividend, NAV of the scheme drops by the same proportion.
If investors go for dividend plans, they most probably miss the compounding opportunities over the long-term for short-term gains.

An Equity head of a mutual fund said “unlike debt funds, where the intention of an investor is to earn dividends on a regular basis, investors in equity funds,  do not always look for dividend”.

At times, the focus is more on capital appreciation.

Even Fund Managers of reputed firms have maintained quite often that they pay dividends every year irrespective of the market conditions and consistency have always been theirs primary concern not the quantum of dividend.

RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

Hello Friends,

Just an extension of our previous blog ”RBI And Its Policies – Part 1″.

RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

In this Blog we would touch upon the aspects as that of Monetary projection from RBI, assessment of economy scenario at present and relevance of RBI policy on economy.

Monetary projection:

For policy purposes, money supply (M3) growth for 2009-10 is placed at 17.0 per cent, down from 18.0 per cent projected in the Annual Policy Statement.

Consistent with this, aggregate deposits of scheduled commercial banks are projected to grow by 18.0 per cent.

The growth in adjusted nonfood credit, including investment in bonds/debentures/shares of public sector undertakings and private corporate sector and Commercial Papers (CPs), has been revised downwards at 18.0 per cent as in the Annual Policy Statement.

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Economy:

Since the last review in July 2009, there has been a discernable improvement in the global economy.

The recovery is underpinned by output expansion in emerging market economies, particularly in Asia.

World output has improved in the second quarter, manufacturing activity has picked up, trade is recovering, financial market conditions are improving, and risk appetite is returning.

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A sharp recovery in equity markets has enabled banks to raise capital to repair their balance sheets.

If we talk about the home country then there are definitive indications of the economy attaining the ‘escape velocity‘ and reverting to the growth track.

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The performance of the industrial sector has improved markedly in recent months.

Domestic and external financing conditions are on the upturn.

Capital inflows have revived.

Moreover activity in the primary capital market has picked up and funding from non-bank domestic sources has eased.

Liquidity conditions have remained easy and interest rates have softened in the money and credit markets.

Growth projection for GDP for 2009-10 on current assessment is placed at 6.0% with an upward bias, the same as the previous policy review.

But some darker parts also persist.

There are clear signs of rising inflation stemming largely from the supply side, particularly from food prices.

Private consumption demand is yet to pick up.

Agricultural production is expected to decline.

Services sector growth remains below trend.

Bank credit growth continues to be sluggish.

The central bank has warned of possible asset price bubbles, raised banks’ provisioning requirements for commercial real estate loans and lifted inflation forecast.

WPI inflation for end-March 2010 is projected at 6.5 per cent with an upward bias.

This is once again higher than the projection of 5.0 per cent made in the Annual Policy Statement in July 2009.

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Stay Tuned for more on the topic.

We would look into Monetary Policy stance, more facts about economic indicators and Analysis from the Analyst from monetary point of view.

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