Posts Tagged ‘shareholders’

Bharti-MTN Deal May Hit Turbulent Weather with New Takeover Norms in Place!!

MTN-Bharti-Deal-in-Danger1

The $23-billion equity swap deal proposed by Bharti Airtel and South Africa’s MTN may hit turbulent weather with India’s capital markets watchdog amending the merger and takeover norms involving international transactions, experts said Tuesday.

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In a move that surprised the corporate sector, the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) Tuesday said the mandatory open offer norm will be triggered even if the overseas equity holdings, in the form of global depository receipts or American depository shares, exceed 15 percent of the total paid-up capital of the target company.

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Earlier, the open offer was mandatory only when the acquisition of shares in the target company exceeded 15 percent during transactions entered into within the country, either through stock market operations or through preferential deals.

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In the Bharti-MTN deal, the two sides proposed to exchange shares in addition to payout of cash that exceeds 15 percent.

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Bharti had proposed to buy 36 percent of the South African company by offering shareholders half a Bharti share, whereas MTN was to get a 25 percent stake in the Indian telecom major for $2.9 billion by issuing global depository receipts.

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β€œIn its existing form, the Bharti-MTN deal will become more complicated because of this amendment. The dynamics have changed and both MTN and Bharti will have to go back to the drawing board to see the deal through,” said SMC Capitals equity head Jagannadham Thunuguntla.

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As per the existing provisions of the SEBI takeover code, no acquirer can buy shares of 15 percent or more in a listed company without making an open offer to acquire a minimum of 20 percent of such listed company’s shares from the public shareholders.

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Announcing the changes in the takeover code, SEBI chairman C.B. Bhave also said that there would be no retrospective effect on earlier deals because of this amendment.

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44,000 Crores to be Raised by Indian Firms :)

Indian-corporates-raise-44k crores

Indian corporates raised Rs 21,691 crore through the qualified institutional placement (QIP) route during the first half of this fiscal and the funds raised through this route are expected to double in the second half.

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Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, the equity head of SMC Capital, said: “As of now, about 48 companies have received requisite resolutions from either shareholders or their boards to raise the funds through QIP route. The total amount proposed to be raised by these companies is about Rs 44,000 crore.”

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He further said: “As there is no requirement for the approval of the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) for the QIP issuance. These companies are ready to offer their QIP whenever they are confident about the market conditions.”

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“Some of the prominent names of the corporates that would be raising funds through this route include Tech Mahindra, Essar Oil, Hindalco, RCom, Omaxe, Pantaloon Retail, Jet Airways, Ansal, JSW Steel and L&T,” he said.

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It seems that the Indian promoters have regained their confidence and enthusiasm for fund raising, he added.

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It is turning out that corporates are raising funds through QIP route as a last alternative and not as a preference.

Most of the IPOs launched in the last seven to eight months had put up a flop show.

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The bank funds that are another source of funding are not available for most of the corporates.

Depending upon the sector and profile, banks are asking for premium over interest rates and for smaller companies, banks are not offering loans.

So the corporates that are looking for the expansions would opt for the QIP route to raise the funds, Mr Thunuguntla added.

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IDFC, KRIBHCO Buy 5% Stake Each in ICE :)

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IDFC and Krishak Bharati Cooperative Limited (KRIBHCO)have purchased a stake ofΒ  5% each in Indian Commodity Exchange, which jointly promoted by Indiabulls Financial Services and MMTC.

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According to sources, the bourse will apply to Forwards Markets Commission, the regulator, after the completion of the formalities of the shareholding agreement.

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With the latest divestment, the current holding of Indiabulls stood at 40% while MMTC has 26%. The other shareholders include HDFC Bank, Yes Bank and Indian Potash.

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FMC guidelines stipulate a maximum shareholding of 40% in a commodity exchange by an anchor investor.
This has to be reduced to 26% within a period of two years starting with the fourth year from the date of exchange’s recognition.

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Earlier, FMC (Forward Markets Commission) rejected United Stock Exchange’s proposal to pick up 10% stake in Indian Commodity Exchange since it was yet to receive full recognition from capital markets regulator SEBI.

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The bourse is the latest entrant into the commodity futures space and will vie with the predominantly metals and energy bourse MCX and agri bourses NCDEX and NMCE.

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In August, FMC had directed the exchange, which had received recognition from the Ministry of Commerce over a year ago, to offer 10 per cent equity of USE to other competent partners and re-submit the application by September-end.

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IFCI Sells over 27 lakh DVR shares of Tata Motors :)

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IFCI has sold more than 27 lakh Differential Voting Right (DVR) shares of Tata Motors in the last two trading sessions through the bulk deal route.

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At the time of the issue of these shares in November last year, IFCI was the sub-underwriter to Tata Motors’ DVR issue, along with JM Financial.

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Of the 6.4 crore DVR shares issued by Tata Motors, IFCI held 81.96 lakh shares (12.77 per cent) as on June 30.

After the sale, IFCI’s stake has fallen to 8.4 per cent.

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Marketmen said IFCI is likely to have sold the DVRs to take advantage of the rise in the share prices.

IFCI had bought the shares at Rs 305 a piece in November last year.

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The Tata Motors DVR stock closed up 4.8 per cent at Rs 368.95 on the BSE.

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β€œIFCI purchased these shares at a lower price; this is quite a decent exit proposition. They have made fair bit of profit from this sale,” said Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, Head of Equities at SMC Capitals.

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Another reason for IFCI’s sale of the DVR shares in the last two trading sessions could be that they wanted to sell before the release of Tata Motors’ consolidated first quarter results on Monday, Mr Thunuguntla said.

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Company has raked in Rs 98 crore through market sales. πŸ™‚

Tata Motors made a consolidated net loss of Rs 329 crore for the quarter ended June 30.

Tata Motors was the first company to issue shares with DVRs in India in November 2008 when it issued 6.4 crore DVR shares as part of its Rs 4,145-crore rights issue to repay the loan taken for its acquisition of Jaguar-Land Rover.

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Know how to make money in shares!!!

Make Money By shares

Everyone wants a piece of the stock market. And why not?

But do you know how shares reward an investor?

If you are a shareholder, there are two ways you can benefit from the profits of a company: capital appreciation or dividend.

Read on to understand how shares reward you. πŸ™‚

Dividends, dividends!

Usually, a company distributes part of the profit it earns as dividend.

Say a company earned a profit of Rs 1 crore (Rs 10 million) in 2004-05.

It keeps half that amount within the company.

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This is used for a variety of purposes β€” buying more machinery, land or raw materials, building a new factory or setting up a new office. It could even be used to repay loans.

The other half is to be distributed as dividend. πŸ™‚

Assume the company has 10,000 shares.

This would mean half the profit β€” ie Rs 50 lakh (Rs 5 million) β€” would be divided by 10,000 shares.

So each share would earn Rs 500. The dividend would then be Rs 500 per share.

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If you own 100 shares of the company, you get a cheque of Rs 50,000 (100 shares x Rs 500) from the company.

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Everyone wants a piece of the stock market. And why not?

But do you know how shares reward an investor?

If you are a shareholder, there are two ways you can benefit from the profits of a company: capital appreciation or dividend.

Read on to understand how shares reward you.

Dividends, dividends!

Usually, a company distributes part of the profit it earns as dividend.

Say a company earned a profit of Rs 1 crore (Rs 10 million) in 2004-05.

It keeps half that amount within the company. This is used for a variety of purposes β€” buying more machinery, land or raw materials, building a new factory or setting up a new office. It could even be used to repay loans.

The other half is to be distributed as dividend.

Assume the company has 10,000 shares. This would mean half the profit β€” ie Rs 50 lakh (Rs 5 million) β€” would be divided by 10,000 shares.

So each share would earn Rs 500. The dividend would then be Rs 500 per share.

If you own 100 shares of the company, you get a cheque of Rs 50,000 (100 shares x Rs 500) from the company.