Posts Tagged ‘share market’

FII investment, this year, is the highest ever inflow in India

FDI inflow India Last year Touched 80 Thousand crores

The FII investment of Rs 80,500 crore in 2009 is the highest ever inflow in the country in rupee terms in a single year and comes a year after they pulled out over Rs 50,000 crore.

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FII inflow so far this year has broken the previous high of Rs 71,486 crore parked by foreign fund houses in domestic equities in 2007.

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Market analysts believe that the FII inflow in India may continue in the next year as well, if the liquidity conditions remain strong.

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As per Market experts, FIIs are expected to continue to be positive on domestic markets and in general Indian markets seems to fare well in 2010.

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Delhi-based SMC Capitals Ltd’s Equity Head Jagannadham Thunuguntla has supported the view, saying,

“If liquidity conditions remain strong next year, one can expect FII inflow to remain strong into India even in 2010 as well.”

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The Bombay Stock Exchange’s benchmark sensex, comprising 30 bluechip stocks, has gained more than 70% so far in 2009, one of the best performers among leading global bourses.

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“However, if dollar-carrytrade-unwinding starts, then one can expect rush of FII outflow from the country, resulting in pressure on Indian markets,” he cautioned.

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Significantly, last year the FIIs had pulled out a net Rs 52,900 crore from the domestic bourses — a trend triggered with the collapse of global financial services icon Lehman Brothers in the middle of September 2008.

This selling trend continued till the first two months of the passing year.

🙂

Global Slowdown Caused Slump in Growth Rate of the Demat Accounts

Global Slowdown Caused Slump in Growth Rate of the Demat Accounts

 

Despite the blistering pace kept by the equities market in the past 10 months, the rise in the number of new retail investors has slowed down.

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According to the data from National Securities and Depositories Limited, the growth rate of demat accounts has declined to 6 per cent, compared with 13 per cent last year.

Experts attribute this to the overall slowdown in the economy.

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As per experts a prolonged, dull phase in 2008 made investors jittery about investing in the equities market.

Also, as many individuals were scared of losing their jobs, so they did not intend to invest more.

There has been an average growth of 14.75 per cent in investors opening demat accounts till 2008.

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Financial intermediaries such as broking companies, whose fortunes are directly linked to the markets, have witnessed subdued sentiments in the equity space from retail investors.

Experts cited 2008 market crash and the global financial meltdown as the reason for this negative development.

Moreover recession of last year had demotivated and scared the retail investors good enough to drive them away from the further investing.

This caused enormous loss for Financial intermediaries and most of the brokerage houses had to shut shop and retrench many staff too.

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“The confidence of the retail investors is yet to be restored. Even in the case of new initial public offerings, only the institutional part is getting oversubscribed,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of research at SMC Capitals.

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BSE and NSE all Set to Improve Arbitration and Appeal Mechanism

NSE BSE Mechanism

BSE and NSE all Set to Improve Arbitration and Appeal Mechanism

Both the BSE and NSE will soon be adopting the best practices in the other to improve the investor grievance redressal mechanism where the NSE is considering putting in place an appeal mechanism similar to the one at BSE.

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However, BSE is looking at scrapping the arbitration fees to be paid by the investor for claims below Rs 10 lakh while efforts are on to provide investors with help from a representative of Investor Associations (IA).

Meanwhile, at present, there is a two-level arbitration process in BSE whereas, in NSE, there is a single-level arbitration meaning if you lose your case in arbitration in NSE you shall have to appeal in the High Court.

Further, in BSE, you can appeal against an unsatisfactory verdict to an appellate panel of 5 arbitrators before taking the matter to court while if the arbitration claim amount is less than Rs 25 lakh on the NSE and less than Rs 10 lakh in case of the BSE, a single arbitrator hears the case.

But, if the arbitration claims are higher than this amount then a panel of 3 arbitrators will decide the case while NSE agreed to the appeal mechanism subject to the Arbitration Act.

In addition, on the BSE, an investor seeking redressal has to file an application with the exchange at Investors’ Grievance Redressal Committee (IGRC) comprising of a former justice of high court and a broker member trying to resolve the dispute at the IGRC level itself.

However, if no mutually agreeable settlement is reached, the parties are advised to go in for arbitration while another proposal, when executed, will be beneficial to investors like the BSE levies arbitration fees of approximately Rs 4,000 whereas on the NSE, for claims of up to Rs 10 lakh, only the brokers have to pay the arbitration fees.

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Points to Remember while Selling Stocks – Part 1

Hello Friends here we come up with our another write up on “SMC Gyan Series”. 🙂


Points to remember while selling stock

Points to remember while selling stock

 

Buying a stock is simple, but Selling is actually harder as it requires regulation, understandable thoughts, and a tight rein on one’s emotions.

The ongoing optimism, slow economic revival, positive signs on the global front and high expectations from the stable government at home have forced bulls to give up their lethargic activities and to march northward.

Many investors who had seen the value of their stocks hit rock bottom and are now facing dilemma whether to sell or should they hold on? :O

Investors often face problems to take right decisions in volatile market as markets could head either way.

Wouldn’t it be disheartening if the markets rallied northwards, the day after you sold your stocks?

What if the markets come crashing down tomorrow, depriving you of the opportunity to enhance profits?

So, the decision to sell is critical.

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Some of the points when to sell your stocks:

Prima facie, if there is any drastic change in fundamental of a company, this should be the only reason to sell stock.

But a depth research has to be done before taking any decision.

Changes includes;

-restructuring of its business model,

-different business focus and directions.

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FIRST THREE POINTS :

1. Margins Crashed

Margins are the profit that a company makes on its sales.

Rising gross margins tell us that a company is reducing production costs or raising prices.

Conversely, deteriorating margins say either that production costs are increasing and the company can’t raise prices proportionally or that the company is cutting prices in an attempt to maintain marketshare.

If there are expenses related to a new product’s introduction then margins might fall for inoffensive reasons.

Falling margins, either gross or operating, often signal a declining competitive position. Thus it’s important to check both.

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2.Is There Any Drastic Change In Company’s Management?

If people in top management of the company say director or president who are liable for a company’s success begin to go away, there might be a few negative implications for the future outlook of that company as an investor.

You must look into and find out the root cause and also to see how much it could impact you.

If negative prospects, investor should sell the stock and should relocate the funds into a similar company that has stronger and more constant management.

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3. What First Fascinated You To The Stock, No Longer Applies

For example, let’s suppose that you bought a stock of a health care company because of its innovative products in the pharmaceutical field and all of a sudden, it loses a crucial patent for a life-saving medicine.

This may result in a decrease of market share in its industry, which might lead to a reduction in future profits (resulting in a decline in the value of its stock).

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Stay Tuned for more on this where we would touch upon other major points needed to keep in mind by investors before making any Buy and sell decision.

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

 

Mutual fund schemes generally boast about high dividends but mutual fund experts say picking a mutual fund scheme on the basis of its dividend payout may not be the best way to invest in the sector.

As per MF experts, comparing the quantum of dividends paid in short term is not the correct way to measure a fund’s performance.

The proportion of dividend depends on a number of factors, including the frequency of payouts over a certain period of time.

There are funds that have higher net asset value (NAVs) but lower dividends, while others have lower NAVs, higher dividends.

Moreover, many analysts believes that the consistency of dividend payout is important than the quantum of dividend.

Experts always insist investors to not to base their investment decision on the percentage of dividend paid in a short period.

Rather Investors should look for the track record of the fund in this regard over a longer period of time.

After the recent equity market bull-run, many equity funds have declared dividends up to 70 per cent.

So far in October, over a dozen of equity schemes have declared dividends.

Experts are of view that the quantum of dividend paid does not directly indicate the performance of the fund, especially in the short term.

Unlike equities, if a mutual fund scheme pays certain percentage of dividend, NAV of the scheme drops by the same proportion.
If investors go for dividend plans, they most probably miss the compounding opportunities over the long-term for short-term gains.

An Equity head of a mutual fund said “unlike debt funds, where the intention of an investor is to earn dividends on a regular basis, investors in equity funds,  do not always look for dividend”.

At times, the focus is more on capital appreciation.

Even Fund Managers of reputed firms have maintained quite often that they pay dividends every year irrespective of the market conditions and consistency have always been theirs primary concern not the quantum of dividend.

High Dividends !! Not the Best Way to Judge MF Schemes :)

High Dividends !! Not the Best Way to Judge MF Schemes

High Dividends !! Not the Best Way to Judge MF Schemes


Mutual fund schemes
generally boast about high dividends but mutual fund experts say picking a mutual fund scheme on the basis of its dividend payout may not be the best way to invest in the sector.

🙂

As per MF experts, comparing the quantum of dividends paid in short term is not the correct way to measure a fund’s performance.

The proportion of dividend depends on a number of factors, including the frequency of payouts over a certain period of time.

There are funds that have higher net asset value (NAVs) but lower dividends, while others have lower NAVs, higher dividends.

🙂

Moreover, many analysts believes that the consistency of dividend payout is important than the quantum of dividend.

Experts always insist investors to not to base their investment decision on the percentage of dividend paid in a short period.

Rather Investors should look for the track record of the fund in this regard over a longer period of time.

🙂

After the recent equity market bull-run, many equity funds have declared dividends up to 70 per cent.

So far in October, over a dozen of equity schemes have declared dividends.

Experts are of view that the quantum of dividend paid does not directly indicate the performance of the fund, especially in the short term.

Unlike equities, if a mutual fund scheme pays certain percentage of dividend, NAV of the scheme drops by the same proportion.
If investors go for dividend plans, they most probably miss the compounding opportunities over the long-term for short-term gains.
🙂

An Equity head of a mutual fund said “unlike debt funds, where the intention of an investor is to earn dividends on a regular basis, investors in equity funds,  do not always look for dividend”.

At times, the focus is more on capital appreciation.

Even Fund Managers of reputed firms have maintained quite often that they pay dividends every year irrespective of the market conditions and consistency have always been theirs primary concern not the quantum of dividend.

🙂