Posts Tagged ‘revenue’

HOW IMPORTANT IS INTEREST RATE?

Essentially, interest is nothing more than the cost someone pays for the use of someone else’s money. In India, an individual willing to purchase a home uses bank’s money (through a mortgage) and in return pays interest to the bank for the privilege or the credit card user borrows money for the short term in order to buy something right away. But the very question that comes to everyone’s mind is how to determine where the rates are heading & what impact will it have?

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So in order to find where the interest rates are heading all one needs to do is to look at the deposits & loans advances of the banks. If banks credit growth is more than its deposits then banks may raise the deposit rates or may increase the lending rates in order to match the asset & liability mismatch. When the Central Bank (RBI) feels that the credit growth has started picking up & is higher than its target levels, RBI tinkers with its policy rates gives signals to the commercial banks to review the interest rates be it on the deposit front or on the lending front.

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Effects of the rising interest rates On individuals

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The first indirect effect of an increased rate is that banks increase the rates that they charge their customers to borrow money. Individuals are affected through increases to credit card and mortgage interest rates, especially if they carry a floating interest rate. This has the effect of decreasing the amount of money consumers can spend. After all, people still have to pay their EMI’s, and when these installments become more expensive, households are left with less disposable income.

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On the Corporates financials

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Corporates too borrow money from banks to run and expand their operations. When the banks make borrowing more expensive, corporates may  not borrow at all or may not borrow at the same pace that they were doing when the rates were lower. Less business spending can slow down the growth of a company, resulting in decreases in profit.

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Even businesses are also indirectly affected as a result of the actions of the individual consumers as individuals are left with less disposable income which affects the company’s top & bottom lines (that is, revenue and profits). Apart from having an indirect affect businesses are affected in a more direct way as well.

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On GDP Growth

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The government essentially has two weapons in its arsenal to help guide the economy towards a path of stable growth without excessive inflation; monetary policy and fiscal policy. Fiscal policy comes from the government in the form of taxation and federal budgeting policies. While fiscal policy can be very effective in specific cases to spur growth in the economy, most market watchers look to monetary policy to do most of the heavy lifting in keeping the economy in a stable growth pattern. Monetary policy is defined as any action to limit or increase the amount of money that is circulating in the economy. That means the central bank (RBI) can make money easier or harder to come by, thereby encouraging spending to spur the economy and constricting access to capital when growth rates seem to be approaching unsustainable levels.

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Stock Price Effects

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Clearly, changes in the rates affect the behavior of consumers and business; hence the stock market is also affected. Remember that one method of valuing a company is to take the sum of all the expected future cash flows from that company discounted back to the present. To arrive at a stock’s price, take the sum of the future discounted cash flow and divide it by the number of shares available. This price fluctuates as a result of the different expectations that people have about the company at different times and are willing to buy or sell shares at different prices. If the company is seen as cutting back on its growth spending or is making less profit – either through higher debt expenses or less revenue from consumers then, the estimated amount of future cash flows will drop. All else being equal, this will lower the price of the company’s stock.

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Investment Effects

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With a lowered expectation in the growth and future cash flows of the company, investors will not get as much growth from stock price appreciation, making stock ownership less desirable. Furthermore, investing in stocks can be viewed as too risky as compared to other investments. When the central bank raises its rate, newly offered government securities, such T- bills and bonds, are often viewed as the safest investments and will usually experience a corresponding increase in interest rates. In other words, the “risk-free” rate of return goes up, making these investments more desirable.

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Conclusion

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We should keep in mind, however, that these factors and results are all interrelated. What we described above are very broad interactions, which can play out in innumerable ways. Interest rates are not the only determinant of stock prices and there are many considerations that go into stock prices and the general trend of the market – an increased interest rate is only one of them. Therefore, one can never say with confidence that an interest rate hike will have an overall negative effect on stock prices.

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Stay Tuned for More Updates :)

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BUDGET PREVIEW 2011 – Final Part :)

Continuing The Final Part Of The Budget Preview 🙂

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We believe that this year Finance Minister will take a gradual move towards fiscal consolidation by increase in Excise duty. Excise duty forms around 40% of Indirect Tax collections. Excise duty collections were down by 13% in April to December period to close to Rs. 70,000 crore comprising around 66% of Budgeted Estimates of Rs. 1,06,477 crore. The factors that contribute to our belief are; 😀

·Though the growth in corporate sales is not astonishing but profitability has improved to due to various cost control efforts which is quite evident by the corporate tax collection that have shown a growth of 44% in December 2009. Cumulatively Net direct tax collections increased by 8.5 per cent during April- December 2009.

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·India being a consumption story has shown healthy growth in sales of consumer durables. For instance Automobile industry’s sales went up by 32 per cent in December over the same month in 2009. It is believed that a gradual hike in duty will get absorbed without affecting medium term prospects of the industry.

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·Partial rollback would also help the finance ministry effect a calibrated integration of excise duty with the services tax by the end of the next financial year, when the proposal for a Goods and Services Tax is likely to be implemented.

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·Finance Minister had indicated that he would like the fiscal deficit for 2010-11 to be around 5.5 per cent of GDP. The proposal to raise excise duty by two hundred basis points is being endorsed also to help the finance ministry raise more revenue and stick to the projected fiscal deficit target.

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Disinvestment would be the key focal point in the Budget. We believe that the Finance Minister would place high targets from the PSU sale proceeds. The factors that contribute to our belief are:

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·In order to bring Fiscal deficit under control that would subsequently ease upward pressure on interest rates.

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·This will help Investment in social sector projects which promote education, health care and employment & will also help in Capital investment.

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On the Corporate Tax front, we believe that the Finance Minster is unlikely to lower tax to 25% from the current 30% as per Industry demands. The rationale behind our belief is:

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·The direct tax code that proposes corporate tax to be 25% will be implemented in fiscal 2011 – 2012 & Industry have to wait till its implementation as it will replace the existing Income Tax act.

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·Already, government is trying to make up more tax revenue & is unlikely to take step in this direction as it may come as an obstacle in order to control fiscal deficit.

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On deregulation of Petroleum sector, we believe that in order to cut down on subsidies government could provide the road map for partial deregulation of the petroleum sector. The road map may provide OMC’s to review the prices of petrol and diesel on a regular basis however, LPG and kerosene could continue to be administered by the government. Factors that complement to our belief:

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·In view of the commitment of the UPA regime to flagship social security programmes that require huge allocations, Mr. Mukherjee has told Mr. Deora that it would not be possible to provide huge subsidies to the OMCs in future.

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·On the External Economy side, we expect that the Finance Minister may continue to provide certain concessions like interest subsidy and extension of other export oriented schemes. The rationale to our belief:

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·In the recent two months i.e. November & December, merchandise exports registered a positive growth of 18.2% & 9.3% respectively. But in the period of April to December 2009, the exports were still negative to the tune of 20% as compared to the corresponding period.

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·The world economic recovery especially in US & Europe is still questionable & the regions constitute approximately 15% & 21% respectively of our merchandise exports, thus directly affecting the trade.

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·Sectors such as engineering goods, jute, carpets, handicrafts and leather goods are continue to be in bad shape, others such as gems & jewelry drugs, plastics and petroleum products are showing improvement.

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·Concluding, the main point is that it may not be a good time to take back the stimulus so soon that may derail the recovery.

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E-Filing of Service Tax to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

E-Filing of Service Tax Set to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

E-Filing of Service Tax Set to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

The government will make electronic filing of service tax mandatory within a couple of months, said a senior official of the Central Board of Excise and Customs (CBEC).

“Electronic filing of service tax will be made compulsory in the next two months,” CBEC member Mr Y G Parande told reporters on the sidelines of a PHD chamber seminar.

Parande also expressed hope that despite impact of stimulus package on realisation of revenue, the government would meet service tax collection target during the financial year.

During the year, the government proposed to garner Rs 65,000 crore as service tax.

The service tax collection during the first seven months has dropped by 5.4 per cent to Rs 28,926 crore compared with corresponding period last year.

The collections of indirect tax, including customs, excise and service tax, fell by 21.6 per cent to Rs 1,26,903 crore during the period of April-October.

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Attributing decline in revenue collections to incentives given by the government to help the economy combat the impact of global slowdown, Mr Parande said, “certainly, the stimulus packages have had the effect (on indirect tax collections), particularly because rates were brought down.”

Earlier, stimulus packages and economic slowdown have hit the exchequer hard as indirect tax collections shrunk by 21.6 per cent to Rs 1.27 lakh crore in the first seven months of this fiscal, against Rs 1.62 lakh crore a year ago.

All the three components of indirect tax — excise, customs and service tax — have registered decline in collections.

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As stimulus is taking a heavy toll on the exchequer, talks have also already begun about when to withdraw it.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had said it will be phased out from next fiscal, while Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee had said it will continue till the global economy recovers.

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