Posts Tagged ‘purchasing power parity’

Indian Economy Set to Become World 3rd Largest in PPP Category

Indian Economy Set to Become World 3rd Largest in PPP Category

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According to a latest report by consultancy firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), India could move into third place in the individual country GDP ranking in the purchasing power parity (PPP) category ahead of  Japan in 2012.

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This report projections stand against the Goldman Sach’s projection of 2032 in its BRIC’s (Brazil, Russia, India, China) report.

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China, which was projected by BRIC’s report to overtake the US as largest economy by 2041, looks set to achieve this by sometime around 2020, the PwC report said.

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“It seems highly likely that by 2030, China will clearly be the largest economy in the world on this measure (PPP), ending over a century of US economic hegemony,” top official of PwC, said in the report.

It said the credit crisis has accelerated the pace at which the emerging economies will overtake the developed ones.

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The report also projected that India is likely to grow faster than China after 2020.

“This is because of India having a significantly younger and faster growing population than China, and also due to it having more catch-up potential as it started from a lower level of economic development than China,” it said.

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However, the report cautioned that India will only realize this if it continues to pursue growth-friendly economic policies of the last two decades.

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As per the report by 2020, it is projected that seven largest emerging economies, E7 (China, India, Brazil, Russia, Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey) would be overtaking the G7 (US, Japan, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Canada) economies.

This will lead to a tectonic shift in the global economic power.

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🙂

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US Economists feel Positive, says Worst is Behind :)

Worst is behind :)

Among the world’s large economies, UK, which is the seventh largest and Italy, the tenth, remain in recession, like the US.

The UK economy shrunk 0.8% in the second quarter, while Italy’s was down 0.5%.

😦

Unlike in the UK, however, economists in the US believe the worst may be behind them.

‘‘It’s quite possible, though not certain, that retrospectively, we’ll say that the recession ended in July or August, may be September,’’ Nobel laureate Paul Krugman was quoted as saying.

🙂

There is evidence that his is not undue optimism.

The pace of job losses in the US slowed more than forecast in July and the unemployment rate dropped for the first time in more than a year.

US GDP also shrank by just 0.3% (equivalent to an annualized 1%) in the seconnd-quarter after a 6.4% drop in the previous three months.

🙂

That explains why US Federal Reserve is willing to bet that the nosedive the economy had witnessed in recent months is behind it.

🙂

Over the last two years, the US has witnessed its worst financial crisis in decades, but that could be ending, which is good news for the world since it accounts for a fifth of global GDP.

🙂

France and Germany also announced unexpected returns to the growth path, which means that four of the world’s five largest economies and six of the top 10 are now not in recession.

🙂

Adding to the sense of optimism, the US Federal Reserve left rates unchanged, saying that the world’s largest economy was showing signs of levelling out.

🙂

Among the five largest economies of the world, measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars — which is more of an apples to apples comparison — China and India are already growing at healthy rates, although lower than their own pace for the last few years.

🙂

Japan too has climbed out of recession and so has Germany.

These economies and the US account for 47% of world GDP in PPP terms.

🙂

Among the world’s other large economies, Brazil is also now no longer in recession having grown by 1.5% in the second quarter.

Among the world’s large economies, UK, which is the seventh largest and Italy, the tenth, remain in recession, like the US. The UK economy shrunk 0.8% in the second quarter, while Italy’s was down 0.5%.

Unlike in the UK, however, economists in the US believe the worst may be behind them. ‘‘It’s quite possible, though not certain, that retrospectively, we’ll say that the recession ended in July or August, may be September,’’ Nobel laureate Paul Krugman was quoted as saying.

There is evidence that his is not undue optimism. The pace of job losses in the US slowed more than forecast in July and the unemployment rate dropped for the first time in more than a year. US GDP also shrank by just 0.3% (equivalent to an annualized 1%) in the seconnd-quarter after a 6.4% drop in the previous three months.

That explains why US Federal Reserve is willing to bet that the nosedive the economy had witnessed in recent months is behind it. Over the last two years, the US has witnessed its worst financial crisis in decades, but that could be ending, which is good news for the world since it accounts for a fifth of global GDP.

Some light showed up at the end of the recession tunnel on Wednesday as France and Germany announced unexpected returns to the growth path, which means that four of the world’s five largest economies and six of the top 10 are now not in recession.

Adding to the sense of optimism, the US Federal Reserve left rates unchanged, saying that the world’s largest economy was showing signs of levelling out. Both France and Germany had been predicted by most economists to face a decline of about 0.3% in their GDPs for the second quarter (April-June) of 2009, but they surprised themselves and the rest of the world by announcing that they’ve actually recorded growth of 0.3% each.

Among the five largest economies of the world, measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars — which is more of an apples to apples comparison — China and India are already growing at healthy rates, although lower than their own pace for the last few years. Japan too has climbed out of recession and so has Germany. These economies and the US account for 47% of world GDP in PPP terms.

The Eurozone as a whole is also now projected to have contracted by just 0.1% compared to the 2.5% fall in GDP in the first quarter (January-March). The growth rates reported by Germany and France may seem like nothing to get excited about, but considering that German GDP shrunk by 3.5% in the first quarter and France’s by 1.3%, it is quite a smart turnaround.

Among the world’s other large economies, Brazil is also now no longer in recession having grown by 1.5% in the second quarter.