Posts Tagged ‘promoters’

Company Insiders Sold Shares Worth Rs.15K Crores

Company Insiders Sold Shares Worth Rs.15 K Crores

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Company insiders, including top management and promoters, have sold shares in their firms worth about Rs.14,950 crore in the past three months.

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This was most perhaps done to cash in on the steep rise in prices during the recent rally and signaling that the market may be fully valued.

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โ€œInsiders are cashing out some part of their shares.

That shows the market is no longer undervalued,โ€ says Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of research at SMC Capital Ltd.

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Since the Bombay Stock Exchangeโ€™s benchmark hit a low of 8,160 points on 9 March earlier this year,

the 30-stock Sensex, Indiaโ€™s most widely tracked index, has risen 103.81%

as foreign investors injected $15.42 billion (Rs 72,165 crore) into the markets, enticed by the prospect of economic growth.

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While major Western economies are barely emerging from a deep recession,

Indiaโ€™s economic output is expected to expand at least 6%, according to estimates by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), making it the second fastest growing major economy.

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Insider sales include those by promoters, top management such as chief executive officers and chief financial officers, as well as sales of treasury stock.

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While insider trades are reported to the stock exchanges, only the number of shares is disclosed.

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Often, such sales take place over a period of time.

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SMC Capital has played a role in the compilation of the data.

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Insider transactions also include share purchases.

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On an overall basis, company insiders bought shares worth around Rs 5,194 crore during the same period, or around one-third of the Rs 14,950 crore of shares sold.

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A large part of these have happened in the last six months because people are still sceptical about the sustainability of the recovery.

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โ€œNo one has any conviction on how long this bull market will last,โ€ said SMCโ€™s Thunuguntla.

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Indeed, with the pace of economic recovery in the West still under question, a potential debt default by Dubai government-promoted entities rocked global markets last week,

sending the Sensex down 3.3% in just two days of trading.

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SEBI Allows Auctions for QIBs in FPOs :)

SEBI Allows Auctions for QIBs in FPOs

Market regulator, SEBI has introduced a significant change in the way institutional bidders invest in follow-on public offers by allowing allotments through auctions.

 

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) has amended the Issue of Capital and Disclosure Requirements Regulations (ICDR) to allow pure auctions for qualified institutional investors (QIBs) in follow-on public offerings to begin with.


The method may be later extended to initial public offerings.

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Under the new method, bidders will be free to bid at any price above the floor price.

At present, allotments are made at the floor price.

Retail investors, however , will be allotted shares at the floor price.

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The board also decided that the issuer is free to place a cap either in terms of the number of shares or percentage to issued capital of the company so that a single bidder does not garner all the shares on offer, ensuring a wider distribution of shareholding.

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Jagannadham Thunuguntla, Equity Head,ย  SMC Capitals, said this means an institutional investor can continue to bid above the floor price and the QIB allotment will be made to the highest bidder.


โ€œThe intent is to enable companies to mop up more funds. Earlier, even when there were huge subscriptions and huge demand for an issue, the company could not get more money. This becomes more relevant in the context of the recently announced divestment plans and FPOs by the government for public sector units,” he said.

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Auction for QIBs is welcome as it would allow risk-taking entities and not just the promoters to be a part of the price discovery process, other analyst said.


A SEBI release issued after the board meeting also said the minimum market capitalisation required by listed firms to sell shares in follow-on offerings has been halved to Rs.5,000 croresย  from Rs 10,000 crore.

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Moreover, the market regulator has also made it a mandatory that all listed companies would have to furnish audited or un-audited balance sheets on a half-yearly basis within 45 days from the end of the quarter instead of the current yearly basis.

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This would imply that Indian companies will be required to disclose balance sheet items.


Shareholders would be able to access the statement of assets and liabilities of the company and its solvency position on a half-yearly basis.


Shareholders would receive immense help in making informed investment decisions now and would be in better position to assess the financial health of the companies, with the implementation of this SEBI regulation of mandating frequent disclosure of the asset-liability position of companies by companies.

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QIPs Outstripped PE Funding & IPOs in Fund Raising Process ;)

QIP-investments-outpace-PEfunds

Qualified institutional placements (QIPs) have outstripped private equity (PE) funding since January by at least eight times, making it by far the most popular fund-raising route for firms this year.

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QIPs raised at least Rs. 21,209 crore since January this year, while PE funds invested only Rs. 2,574 crore in listed firms.

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QIPs have almost raised more than twice of initial public offerings.

A QIP is a private placement by a listed company of shares or securities convertible to equity with qualified institutional buyers approved by market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India(SEBI).

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Data from Delhi-based investment bank SMC Capitals Ltd shows another 48 QIPs worth Rs.43,891 crore are in the pipeline.

But analysts do not expect a significant rise in the number of, or funds through, PE deals this year.

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Typically, PE investments take up to six months to complete, whereas a QIP can be done in up to four weeks, making the fund-raising process faster and more reliable since the institutional buyers are selected carefully.

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Also, in a QIP, the institutional buyers rarely seek a seat on the company board, or management control, a common practice in large PE deals.

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Since PE is perceptionally intrusive for promoters, QIP serves as a good alternative.

However this QIP structure is liked by investors and firms as in a QIP the window is shorter and money can be raised quickly.

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While real estate firms typically prefer QIPs for their need of capital at short notice, the companies currently waiting to do QIPs are across sectors, including telecom, entertainment, retail and information technology.

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In line for QIPs are Reliance Communications Ltd, Pyramid Saimira Theatre Ltd, Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltdย  and few more.

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Some firms, though, have taken both routes for their funding needs.

Historically, PE investments in India have been in the form of private investments in public enterprises, or PIPEs, which also happen to the only firms eligible for QIPs.

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โ€œPrivate equity investors have missed the boat,โ€ Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of SMC Capitals, said in a statement.

Companies that are in the pipeline for QIPs may also look for American depository receipts or global depository receipts for funds, heย  added.

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44,000 Crores to be Raised by Indian Firms :)

Indian-corporates-raise-44k crores

Indian corporates raised Rs 21,691 crore through the qualified institutional placement (QIP) route during the first half of this fiscal and the funds raised through this route are expected to double in the second half.

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Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, the equity head of SMC Capital, said: “As of now, about 48 companies have received requisite resolutions from either shareholders or their boards to raise the funds through QIP route. The total amount proposed to be raised by these companies is about Rs 44,000 crore.”

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He further said: “As there is no requirement for the approval of the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) for the QIP issuance. These companies are ready to offer their QIP whenever they are confident about the market conditions.”

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“Some of the prominent names of the corporates that would be raising funds through this route include Tech Mahindra, Essar Oil, Hindalco, RCom, Omaxe, Pantaloon Retail, Jet Airways, Ansal, JSW Steel and L&T,” he said.

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It seems that the Indian promoters have regained their confidence and enthusiasm for fund raising, he added.

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It is turning out that corporates are raising funds through QIP route as a last alternative and not as a preference.

Most of the IPOs launched in the last seven to eight months had put up a flop show.

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The bank funds that are another source of funding are not available for most of the corporates.

Depending upon the sector and profile, banks are asking for premium over interest rates and for smaller companies, banks are not offering loans.

So the corporates that are looking for the expansions would opt for the QIP route to raise the funds, Mr Thunuguntla added.

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Did IPO Grading Fail to Catch the Fancy of Investors??

ipo grade system

The grading system of initial public offers (IPO) is in need of an upgrade, say market participants.

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Two years after it was first introduced by market regulator SEBI, the system has failed to catch the fancy of investors as share price trends of newly listed companies have shown little or no correlation to the grading given by rating agencies.

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“IPOs with grading 4 have shown returns that are much lower than IPOs with grades 1 and 2.
So, this is raising the question whether it is time to look at amendments to the existing structure or maybe SEBI can think of completely scrapping the system,” said Jagannadham T, equity head of SMC Capitals.

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However, one can’t deny the importance of the IPO grading system not only is it beneficial for retail investors who don’t have the time or skills to go through an entire prospectus but it also acts as a deterrent for fly by night promoters who wish to access the primary market solely for their gains.

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Not only financials of a company is looked at but also people at the business head level are contacted to see what the company is up to.

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As per few experts, IPO grading doesn’t have anything to do with the price post listing. A lot of things apart from fundamentals drive the stock.

The reservation of comment on pricing is a sore point, but even more, is the grading of a SEBI barred company like Austral Coke at Grade 2 by CARE above Orbit Corporation at 1 by the same rating agency.

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And this makes one wonder if a thorough due diligence is done by all rating agencies that’s ground enough for a review.

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Sebi steps in to protect minority shareholders

In a market where there are few cases of stocks with differential voting rights (DVRs), last week’s change to the Equity Listing Agreement, at first glance, seems to protect the interests of minority shareholders.

Sebi’s step is ostensibly to prevent situations wherein companies come out with follow-on-issues, rights issues or preferential allotments with higher voting rights per share, helping promoters get greater control in the company.

Though a rarity in India, there are many examples abroad such as the Ford family, which controls 40 per cent of shareholder votes with only about 4 per cent of the equity in Ford Motors.

The dual-class stock structure has worked for many including Warren Buffett, a majority shareholder of Berkshire Hathaway, which offers Class-B shares with 1/200th of the voting rights of a Class A share.

Google, at the time of going public, reserved Class-B shares with 10 votes a share for insiders and sold Class-A shares with one vote to the public, helping retain control with select shareholders.

It’s not that the amendment by the Sebi last Wednesday sealed such a possibility in India as the US stock exchanges, the NYSE or the Nasdaq, too, do not allow it.

The New York Stock Exchange allows companies to list dual-class voting shares, but once listed, firms cannot reduce the voting rights of the existing shares or issue a new class of superior voting shares.

So, a second look at Sebi’s amendment shows something else.

“More than preventing issue of fresh shares with superior rights, the amendment is about allowing firms to come out with shares with inferior rights,” said SMC Capitals equity head Jagannadham Thunuguntla.

Though shares with differential voting rights is not new in India (Tata Motors and Pantaloon issued shares with DVRs last year), lack of awareness has kept trading in DVR shares insignificant, he said.

According to Sebi regulations, firms can come up with fresh issues that offer inferior rights in terms of voting or dividend, thereby helping raise equity without resorting to debt and giving up control.

Securities and Exchange Board of India’s (Sebi) amendment of regulations to prohibit companies from issuing fresh shares with superior rights vis a vis the rights of existing shareholders seems to have been taken in the light of experiences abroad.