Posts Tagged ‘NMCE’

Commodity Trading :)

As you know we already have discussed about commodity trading but missed some of the points. So here we are discussing those points πŸ™‚

What is a Trend in Commodity Trading?

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When prices are steadily moving higher or lower over a period of time it is considered as a trend. If prices are rising over time it is consider an uptrend. If prices are declining over a period of time then it is considered a downtrend.

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Reason behind following the trend is that prices are more likely to continue in that same direction than reverse. We can put the odds in our favor by trading this way.

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Tips on how to follow the Trend

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We can’t predict how high or low a market is going to move. Therefore, if we are following trends, we can catch some very profitable moves in the commodity markets.

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Two common ways to enter the markets when we spot a trend:

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  • Buy on a pullback. When the market is moving higher for ten days in a row, wait for a 2-3 day where prices decline and then buy.

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  • Buy when the market makes new highs. It is the hardest thing for many traders to do.

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Remember we should trade with the trend of the market to increase our chances of success. πŸ™‚

What is Day Trading?

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Day trading is the process of buying and selling a futures contract(s) within the same day. Day trades can last for a couple minutes or sometimes they are held for most of the trading session. Day trading is not recommended for new futures traders since it takes a lot of knowledge, experience and discipline to day trade futures successfully.

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What are Futures Options?

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Buy or sell a futures contract at a designated strike price is the right of an option not an obligation. We buy options to bet on the price of a futures contract to go higher or lower for trading purposes. There are two main types of options – calls and puts.

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Calls –If we believe the underlying futures price will move higher we can buy a call option. For example, if we expect soybean futures to move higher, we will want to buy a corn call option..

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Puts –If we believe the underlying futures price will move lower we can buy a put option. For example, if we expect corn futures to move lower, we will want to buy a soybean put option.

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Benefits of Online Trading

Trading commodities online is almost a one-stop shop. Most online brokers will have real time quotes, charts, futures news, technical analysis programs and research available for their clients. This has opened the door for online traders to make more of their own trading decisions and implement trading strategies that once were not available to the average retail trader.

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If you are going to day trade commodities and futures, you definitely want to trade online, unless you have someone else managing your account.

SMC Comtrade Limited, a key constituent of SMC Group of Companies, came into existence since the very start of Commodity Exchanges in India. With nationwide presence, it is enabling the retail & corporate investors to diversify their portfolio and enjoy the benefits of trading in MCX, NCDEX & NMCE. Its highly appreciated research team guides the investors in making wise investment decisions for agri-commodities as well as international commodities.

SMC Comex International DMCC (part of SMC Group) is one of the initial, leading & experienced, clearing and broking member of Dubai Gold and Commodities Exchange (DGCX). It offers trading in Gold, Silver, Crude (WTI & Brent), Forex (INR, Euro, Dollar & sterling) and Steel Rebar Contracts.

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We provide various trading solutions to suit clients’ requirements. Our products are tailored to provide convenience to the clients & keep them satisfied. We offer Commodities Trading in offline mode as well as online mode; client can trade at the comfort of his home / office at any time using our platform.

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Which are the most prominent commodity exchanges across the world?

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  1. Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT )

  2. Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME)

  3. New York Board of Trade (NYBOT)

  4. New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX)

  5. London Metal Exchange (LME)

  6. London International Financial Futures Options Exchange (LIFFE)

  7. The Tokyo Commodity Exchange (TOCOM)

  8. Kuala Lumpur Commodity Exchange (KLCE)

  9. Bursa Malaysia Derivatives Exchange.

Stay Tuned for more and more on thisΒ :)

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However For More latest Industry,Stock Market and Economy News Updates,Click Here

Know the Basics of Commodity Trading – Final Part

Hello Friends here we come up with an extension of our previous blogΒ  β€œWhy Commodities Trading? Know Now.. Part 1“.

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Know the Basics of Commodity Trading - Final Part

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Yesterday we read about the importance and need for Commodity Trading.

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In this blog we would read to understand that how can we do commodity trading, what is the process for that and how commodity trading works.

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Here we go with first question of the topic for the day..


How do you do commodity Trading?

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When you buy a Gold Futures contract, you undertake to do three things.

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1. Buy the amount of gold specified in the contract.

2. Buy it at the price specified in the contract.

3. Buy it on the expiry of the contract.

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This could be after one month, two months, three months and so on.


Of course, if you sell the Gold Futures contract before it expires, then you don’t have to worry about actually buying the gold.

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Let’s say you buy the Gold Future contract at say Rs 15000 per 10 gm.

Your hunch comes true and the gold prices rally to Rs 16000 per 10 gm.

You can sell the Gold Futures any time before expiry of the contract.


Gold and other commodity futures prices are quoted on the commodity exchanges in exactly the same way in which stock prices or stock futures prices are quoted on a daily basis in the stock markets.

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Now let us see How Commodity Trading works?

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They work just like stock futures πŸ™‚

When you buy a Futures, you don’t have to pay the entire amount, just a fixed percentage of the cost.

This is known as the margin.


Let’s say you are buying a Gold Futures contract. The minimum contract size for a gold future is 100 gms.

100 gms of gold may be worth Rs 72,000. The margin for gold set by MCX is 3.5%.

So you only end up paying Rs 2,520.

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The low margin means that you can buy futures representing a large amount of gold by paying only a fraction of the price.

So you bought the Gold Futures contract when it was Rs 72,000 per 100 gms.


The next day, the price of gold rose to Rs 73,000 per 100 gms.Β  Rs 1,000 (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,000) will be credited to your account.

The following day, the price dips to Rs 72,500. Rs 500 will get debited from your account (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,500).

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Things You need to know about Commodities Trading πŸ™‚

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Compared to stocks, trading in commodities is much cheaper, because margins are much lower than in stock futures.

Brokerage is low for commodity futures. It ranges from 0.05% to 0.12%.

Because of this, commodity futures are a speculator’s paradise.

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If you are a hard-core trader who follows the technical charts and do not really care what you trade, and if you are nimble and savvy, then commodity futures could be another asset class that you would be interested in.

The advantages in this line is that there are no balance sheets, no complicated financial statements.

All you need to do is follow the supply and demand position of the commodities you trade in very closely.

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Visit the commodities trading exchanges – NCDEX,NMCE and MCX – to find out which commodities are offered for trading, their contract size and other criteria.

You will have to get hold of a commodities broker but that should not be a problem.

There are lots of brokers that offer commodity trading these days.

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But, it would be wise to avoid commodity trading if you are a rookie or beginner.

A much better move would be always to initially trade in stock futures before opting for commodity futures.

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Note : For More Latest Industry, Stock Market and Economy News and Updates, please Click Here

Vegetable Prices to Ease by January : Planning Commission

Hello Friends here we come up with the Latest Major Agri-Commodities updates from various parts of the country.

Vegetable Prices to Ease by January : Planning Commission

Vegetable Prices to Ease by January : Planning Commission

Planning Commission Deputy Chairperson Montek Singh Ahluwalia Sunday said he expected vegetable prices to ease by January.

“At the end of a bad monsoon, the big pressure is on vegetables.

The annual inflation rate for food articles was sharply higher at 13.39 percent for the week under review.

Similarly, the annual rise in the index for pulses was 23.44 percent and that for cereals was 11.15 percent.

He also said that “By December-January, you will see at least something (fall in prices) for vegetables, there will be a different position,” Ahluwalia added.

“It (vegetable) is not something you can import, but in general, certainly in management of public distribution system, we are in a strong position as far as stocks are concerned,” he contended.

“There is more than enough food stock in the country. We do not have to worry on that score.”

The Reserve Bank of India and the government have both warned that India’s annual rate of inflation based on wholesale price index for all commodities would rise to 6-6.5 percent by March, while the Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council has pegged it at 6 percent.

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In Other major Commodities Updates we can see that NMCE has kick started trading in gold guinea contract. πŸ™‚

NMCE kicks starts trading in gold guinea contract:

National Multi Commodity Exchange of India (NMCE), the first commodity exchange of the country, has started trading in gold guinea contract to reach to the masses.

The commex has tied-up with Muthoot Group to set up multiple delivery centres.

The guinea would be a Muthoot branded BIS certified serially numbered,available in a tamper proof packing.

The purchase/delivery of the gold guinea will be made available through the Muthoot Finance’s 22 centers across the country, which include Ahmedabad, Kolkata, Jaipur, Mumbai, Indore, Delhi, Rajkot, Kanpur, Lucknow in the North and Trivandrum, Kollam, Kottayam, Calicut, Chennai, Coimbatore, Madurai, Truichi, Bangalore, Mangalore, Hyderabad, Trichur.

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Note : For More Latest Industry, Stock Market and Economy News and Updates, please Click Here

Know the Basics of Commodity Trading :) Part 2

commodity-trade

Hello Friends,yesterday we discussed about the importance and need for Commodity Trading.

Now its time to understand and know that how can we do commodity trading, what is the process for that and how commodity trading works

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Here we go with first question of the topic for the day πŸ™‚

How do you do commodity Trading?

When you buy a Gold Futures contract, you undertake to do three things.

1. Buy the amount of gold specified in the contract.

2. Buy it at the price specified in the contract.

3. Buy it on the expiry of the contract.

This could be after one month, two months, three months and so on.

Of course, if you sell the Gold Futures contract before it expires, then you don’t have to worry about actually buying the gold.

πŸ™‚

Let’s say you buy the Gold Future contract at say Rs 15000 per 10 gm.

Your hunch comes true and the gold prices rally to Rs 16000 per 10 gm.

You can sell the Gold Futures any time before expiry of the contract.

Gold and other commodity futures prices are quoted on the commodity exchanges in exactly the same way in which stock prices or stock futures prices are quoted on a daily basis in the stock markets.

πŸ™‚

Now let us see How Commodity Trading works?

They work just like stock futures :).

When you buy a Futures, you don’t have to pay the entire amount, just a fixed percentage of the cost.

This is known as the margin.

Let’s say you are buying a Gold Futures contract.
The minimum contract size for a gold future is 100 gms.
100 gms of gold may be worth Rs 72,000.

The margin for gold set by MCX is 3.5%.
So you only end up paying Rs 2,520.

πŸ™‚

The low margin means that you can buy futures representing a large amount of gold by paying only a fraction of the price.

So you bought the Gold Futures contract when it was Rs 72,000 per 100 gms.

The next day, the price of gold rose to Rs 73,000 per 100 gms.

Rs 1,000 (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,000) will be credited to your account.

The following day, the price dips to Rs 72,500.

Rs 500 will get debited from your account (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,500).

πŸ™‚

Things You need to know about Commodities Trading πŸ™‚

Compared to stocks, trading in commodities is much cheaper, because margins are much lower than in stock futures.

Brokerage is low for commodity futures.
It ranges from 0.05% to 0.12%.

Because of this, commodity futures are a speculator’s paradise.

πŸ™‚

If you are a hard-core trader who follows the technical charts and do not really care what you trade, and if you are nimble and savvy, then commodity futures could be another asset class that you would be interested in.

The advantages in this line is that there are no balance sheets, no complicated financial statements.

All you need to do is follow the supply and demand position of the commodities you trade in very closely.

πŸ™‚

Visit the commodities trading exchanges – NCDEX,NMCE and MCX – to find out which commodities are offered for trading, their contract size and other criterias.

You will have to get hold of a commodities broker but that should not be a problem.

There are lots of brokers that offer commodity trading these days.

πŸ™‚

But, it would be wise to avoid commodity trading if you are a rookie or beginner.

A much better move would be always to initially trade in stock futures before opting for commodity futures.

πŸ™‚

Just like stock futures (Read How to trade in Futures to understand how futures work).

When you buy a Futures, you don’t have to pay the entire amount, just a fixed percentage of the cost. This is known as the margin.

Let’s say you are buying a Gold Futures contract. The minimum contract size for a gold future is 100 gms. 100 gms of gold may be worth Rs 72,000.

The margin for gold set by MCX is 3.5%. So you only end up paying Rs 2,520.

The low margin means that you can buy futures representing a large amount of gold by paying only a fraction of the price.

So you bought the Gold Futures contract when it was Rs 72,000 per 100 gms.

The next day, the price of gold rose to Rs 73,000 per 100 gms.

Rs 1,000 (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,000) will be credited to your account.

The following day, the price dips to Rs 72,500.

Rs 500 will get debited from your account (Rs 73,000 – Rs 72,500).

IMCX-India’s Fourth National Commodity Bourse, To Be Launched Soon:)

IMCX-to-be-launched

International Multi Commodity Exchange (IMCX)

Commodity trading in India has a long history & was started much before it started in many other countries.

Today, apart from numerous regional exchanges, India has three national commodity exchanges namely, Multi Commodity Exchange (MCX), National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange (NCDEX) and National Multi-Commodity Exchange (NMCE).

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THE RISING WAVES

These commodity exchanges have been performing extremely well in these years.

The turnover of commodity exchanges in India surged by 31% in the April-August period, led by a surge in trading of farm goods.

Total value of trading at the Commodity Exchanges during the fortnight from 16th August 2009 to 31st August 2009 was Rs. 3,04,651.88 crore.

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NEED OF THE HOUR

In India, futures’ trading in commodities is zooming.

India’s commodity exchanges have witnessed major action this year and are getting into investing and managing new commodity bourses.

Another commodity exchange may help using the opportunities better ; thereby improving trading volumes of specific contracts & be more efficient is the price discovery, which in turn will attract a wider constituency of participants from the entire commodity value chain i.e. government, producers, marketers, importers, exporters etc.

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THE FIRST STEP

A new commodity exchange, International Multi Commodity Exchange is going to launch very soon under the market regulator Forward Markets Commission (FMC).

IMCX is promoted by Indiabulls Financial Services Ltd (IBFSL) and India’s biggest state-run trading firm, MMTC Ltd, and part-owned by more institutions.

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The exchange is planning to start operations next month as the country’s fourth national commodity bourse & is ready to grab its share of a futures market that is growing 30% a year.

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BUILDING TECH – PLATFORM

The US-based exchange services provider Millennium Information Technology (MIT) has been awarded the contract for implementing the technology platform for the aforesaid exchange.

The US-headquartered MIT provides application solutions to financial and telecom industries.

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THE PILLARS OF FOUNDATION

IMCX will be the first commodity bourse in India to comply with the criteria of revised ownership criteria that makes the participation compulsory of public sector units or cooperatives.

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Currently, Indiabulls Financial Services Ltd. (IBFSL) holds 40% of the exchange, state-run MMTC Ltd. holds 26%.

Forward Markets Commission rejected the United Stock Exchange of India’s (USE’s) 10% stake buy in the bourse, on the grounds that the stock exchange is yet to be fully recognized.

So far, Indiabulls has diluted 24 per cent to HDFC Bank, Yes Bank and Indian Potash Ltd & IDFC + Krishak Bharati Cooperative Limited (KRIBHCO) have purchased a stake of 5% each in Indian Commodity Exchange, which was to be sold to the USE earlier.

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BUSINESS OPERATIONS

The exchange will start operations by launching 10-12 contracts in bullion, metals, energy and agricultural commodities with some uniqueness in contracts to attract more volume.

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Β·The exchange will launch gold mini and gold 1 kilogram contracts in the bullion segment. The gold contracts will have multiple delivery centers in five-six cities.

Β· In base metals, it is planning to offer copper, zinc and lead or nickel futures, and in the energy segment it will launch crude oil and natural gas contracts. Delivery-based contracts will be launched in the base metal segment, where contracts are mostly non-deliverable at other exchanges.

Β·The exchange has also tied up with several logistic providers for warehouse facilities, & in the next phase of expansion, the exchange may create its own warehouses

Β·Guar seed, rapeseed, refined soyoil, soybean and turmeric will be among the agricultural contracts.

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IDFC, KRIBHCO Buy 5% Stake Each in ICE :)

IDFC-KRIBHCO-buy-5%-stake

IDFC and Krishak Bharati Cooperative Limited (KRIBHCO)have purchased a stake ofΒ  5% each in Indian Commodity Exchange, which jointly promoted by Indiabulls Financial Services and MMTC.

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According to sources, the bourse will apply to Forwards Markets Commission, the regulator, after the completion of the formalities of the shareholding agreement.

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With the latest divestment, the current holding of Indiabulls stood at 40% while MMTC has 26%. The other shareholders include HDFC Bank, Yes Bank and Indian Potash.

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FMC guidelines stipulate a maximum shareholding of 40% in a commodity exchange by an anchor investor.
This has to be reduced to 26% within a period of two years starting with the fourth year from the date of exchange’s recognition.

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Earlier, FMC (Forward Markets Commission) rejected United Stock Exchange’s proposal to pick up 10% stake in Indian Commodity Exchange since it was yet to receive full recognition from capital markets regulator SEBI.

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The bourse is the latest entrant into the commodity futures space and will vie with the predominantly metals and energy bourse MCX and agri bourses NCDEX and NMCE.

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In August, FMC had directed the exchange, which had received recognition from the Ministry of Commerce over a year ago, to offer 10 per cent equity of USE to other competent partners and re-submit the application by September-end.

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