Posts Tagged ‘Mutual Funds’

Corporate Bonds to be Routed through Clearing Houses: SEBI

Trade in corporate bonds would have to be routed through clearing houses from very soon

Trade in corporate bonds would have to be routed through clearing houses from very soon

Market regulator SEBI has said that trade in corporate bonds would have to be routed through clearing corporations from December 1, a move that experts say would check factors that aggravated financial crisis.

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Directives of the Sebi will be applicable to corporate bond trading that are not currently settled through clearing corporations or clearing houses of stock exchanges.

“It has now been decided that, all trades in corporate bonds between specified entities shall necessarily be cleared and settled through the National Securities Clearing Corp (NSCCL) or Indian Clearing Corp (ICCL),” it said.

The specified entities are mutual funds, foreign institutional investors/ sub-accounts, venture capital funds, foreign venture capital investors, portfolio managers, and RBI regulated entities, the Sebi said.

“The provisions of this circular shall be applicable to all corporate bonds traded Over The Counter (OTC) or on debt segment of stock exchanges on or after Dec 01, 2009,” it said.

SMC Capitals Equity Head Jagannadham Thunuguntla said, “It is a learning from the global financial crisis.Β  One of the major reasons for the crisis to be so severe was that many fancy financial instruments were traded OTC with no records.”

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Interest Rate Futures Section – Final Part :)

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Hello Friends, we are here with the Final Part of our Interest Rate Futures educational section.
We would touch upon the benefits of the Interest Rate Futures and the future scenario related to it.

Here we go :

Key benefits of Interest Rate Futures:

Directional trading

As there is an inverse relationship between interest rate movement and underlying bond prices, so if one has strong view that the interest rates will rise in near future then he can take short position in IRF contracts and can be benefited from the falling futures bond prices.

Hedging portfolio

The holders of the GOI securities are exposed to risk of rising interest rates which in turn results in the reduction in the value of the portfolio.

So in order to protect against a fall in the value of the portfolio they can take short position in IRF.

Calendar spread trading

This spread is also known as an inter-delivery spread.

It is the simultaneous purchase of one delivery month of a given futures contract and the sale of another delivery month of the same underlying on the same exchange.

For example:

Buying a September 09 and simultaneously selling a December 09 contract.
A market participant can profit as the price difference between the two contracts widens.

The either case can also be possible.

Reduce the duration of portfolio:

Bonds with longer maturities are more sensitive to interest rate changes, and bond portfolio with longer duration will be more exposed to the vulnerability of the movement in interest rate.

So portfolio manager who is concerned about the rise in the short term interest rate risk would like to reduce the duration of the portfolio.

By entering into the IRF contract to NSE, the portfolio manager can reduce duration of the portfolio.

Arbitraging between cash and futures market:

Arbitrage is the price difference between the bond prices in underlying bond market and IRF contract without any view about the interest rate movement.

One can earn the risk-less profit from realizing arbitrage opportunity and entering into the IRF contract traded on NSE by initiating cash and carry trade.

Responses After launch:

After the launch of currency futures in August 2008, Interest-rate futures are the first major product to be introduced in India.

The interest rate futures began on August 31,2009 clocking trading volumes of Rs 276 crore in their first day of trade.

Market participants responded passionately to the product launch on the first day.

In around five hours of trading time available after inauguration, 1,475 trades were recorded resulting in 14,559 contracts being traded at a total value of Rs 267.31 crore.

In the beginning only two quarters has been introduced out of four, among which December 2009 was the most active with 13,789 contracts which has been traded actively.

There are nearly 638 members registered for this new product, out of which 21 are banks and there contribution to the total gross volume was 32.48 percent.

Future scenario:

BSE had received regulatory approval for interest rates futures and would launch in 8-10 weeks.

The Multi Commodity Exchange’s foreign exchange derivatives bourse has sought permission to launch trade in interest rate futures.

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INTEREST RATE FUTURES – Part 2

Hello Friends, just an extension of our previous blog on interest rates futures where we touched upon the topic of interest rates future and what is it exactly.

Now we would understand that why is there need for interst rate futures and many more related aspects in this regard.

Here we go :

Why Interest rate futures?

Why Interest rate futures?

Why Interest rate futures?

The risk associated with the interest rate is uncertain and it never has been constant in the past, infact it would not remain constant in future also.

The volatility of interest rates has increased manifold in the last couple of years and recorded 17.40% in 2008 as compared to 8.51% in 2007.

This high fluctuation in volatility increases risk and requires tools to manage those risks.

Interest rate futures are the product for managing such interest rate risk.

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Backbone of Interest Rate Future:

NSE, India’s largest stock exchange, began interest rate futures and offers the same reliable features as it provide to its other products with the following advantages:

β€’Standardization and flexibility

β€’Price transparency and liquidity

β€’Leverage effect due to a wider collateral management

β€’Advance trading software and technological edge

β€’Centralized clearing supported by guaranteed settlement

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Who can be a part of it?

The major market participants of interest rate futures are

β€’Banks and Primary Dealers

β€’ Mutual Funds and Insurance Companies

β€’ Corporate Houses and Financial Institutions,

β€’FIIs and NRIs

β€’ Member Brokers and Retail Investors.

In Final part of this topic (which we would cover in our next blog), we would throw light on the benefits of the Interest Rate Futures and the future scenario related to Interest rate futures.

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Stay Tuned πŸ˜‰

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44,000 Crores to be Raised by Indian Firms :)

Indian-corporates-raise-44k crores

Indian corporates raised Rs 21,691 crore through the qualified institutional placement (QIP) route during the first half of this fiscal and the funds raised through this route are expected to double in the second half.

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Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, the equity head of SMC Capital, said: “As of now, about 48 companies have received requisite resolutions from either shareholders or their boards to raise the funds through QIP route. The total amount proposed to be raised by these companies is about Rs 44,000 crore.”

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He further said: “As there is no requirement for the approval of the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) for the QIP issuance. These companies are ready to offer their QIP whenever they are confident about the market conditions.”

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“Some of the prominent names of the corporates that would be raising funds through this route include Tech Mahindra, Essar Oil, Hindalco, RCom, Omaxe, Pantaloon Retail, Jet Airways, Ansal, JSW Steel and L&T,” he said.

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It seems that the Indian promoters have regained their confidence and enthusiasm for fund raising, he added.

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It is turning out that corporates are raising funds through QIP route as a last alternative and not as a preference.

Most of the IPOs launched in the last seven to eight months had put up a flop show.

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The bank funds that are another source of funding are not available for most of the corporates.

Depending upon the sector and profile, banks are asking for premium over interest rates and for smaller companies, banks are not offering loans.

So the corporates that are looking for the expansions would opt for the QIP route to raise the funds, Mr Thunuguntla added.

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Let’s Talk About Mutual Funds ;)

mutual-funds-basics

Friends we will discuss now as to what are mutual funds before going on to seeing why to invest in mutual funds instead of stock πŸ™‚

What is a Mutual Fund?

A mutual fund is an investment that pools money from many investors, and that money is used to invest in stocks, bonds and other securities.

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One mutual fund share includes a portion of a share of each stock held in the fund’s portfolio.

The stocks these mutual funds have are very fluid and are used for buying or redeeming and/or selling shares at a net asset value.

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Mutual funds posses shares of several companies and receive dividends in lieu of them and the earnings are distributed among the share holders.

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Who Decides What a Mutual Fund Invests In?

Mutual fund managers decide what securities to buy or sell guided by the mutual fund’s objectives.

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If a mutual fund’s objective is to invest in the energy sector, the manager cannot buy shares in technology stocks.

Fund objectives let you know what to expect now and in the future.

Mutual funds can be either or both of open ended and closed ended investment companies depending on their fund management pattern.

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An open-end fund offers to sell its shares (units) continuously to investors either in retail or in bulk without a limit on the number as opposed to a closed-end fund.

Closed end funds have limited number of shares.

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Why Invest in Mutual Funds Instead of Stock?

You can invest in both mutual funds and individual stocks, but mutual funds are particularly useful in some cases.

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*Diversification: If you do not have a lot of money to invest, creating your own diversified portfolio to spread risk will be difficult.

Diversification is automatic in mutual funds.

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*Time : Successful investors take hours every week to analyze their holdings, stock market conditions and to educate themselves further on investing.

Mutual funds are a wise choice for those who lack the time to follow stocks so closely.

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* Experience: Consistently investing well takes a few years of experience and learning from mistakes and successes.
If you are not experienced with trading stocks but want returns over and above what a savings account offers, investing in mutual funds is a good way to grow your personal assets.

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Nifty Hit the Level of 5,000 :)

nifty-climb-5000k

Nifty hit the significant level of 5,000, first time since May 23, 2008, taking 326 trading sessions while, the standard index prepared early gains to close flat after hitting 5,003 at its day’s high.

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However, nifty closed slightly higher at 4,965, up 7 points whereas another standard Sensex also ended flat at 16,711, up 34 points, off its day’s high of 16,820 while both the indices were lower by over 4.4% decline in heavyweight RIL.

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Moreover, RIL stated that it has raised around Rs 3,188 crore through sale of 1.50 crore equity shares of the company and selling pressure in RIL weighed down on the oil & gas index, down 2.8%.

Additionally, the BSE realty index slid 0.9%, Unitech lost 3% and Phoenix Mills declined 2.4% while IT and auto stocks increased.

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Similarly, the BSE IT index gained 1.9%, Patni Computer and HCL Tech rose over 6% while the auto index on the BSE was also up 1.5% and Amtek Auto increased 14.6%.

On the other hand, in the Sensex pack, ACC emerged as the biggest gainer while the stock advanced 3.6% to Rs 827 however, Hindalco, JP Associates, Bharti Airtel and Maruti Suzuki gained over 3% each.

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Further, RIL was declared the top loser in the group followed by Tata Steel and ITC.

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A correction is expected and likely to take place in markets at current levels. But it is unlikely to be a sharp one.

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European and Asian stock markets extended the week’s rally on Thursday, hitting new highs for the year, as investors became increasingly confident that the U.S. economy , the world’s largest , is growing again.

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Rights Given to MF holders By SEBI :)

MF-Investor-Rights

The recent move by SEBI, banning entry load and capping exit load, among other things, has turned the spotlight on the possible improvement in rights of mutual fund (MF) holders in the country.

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Sure, we already have regulations in place. But the recent Sebi move points to improvement in investor rights.

The important rights that are available to MF holders are as below as per Sebi Regulations on MFs:

A) An investor is entitled to receive statements of accounts in 6 weeks from the date of request for unit certificates.

Every unit holder has the right to receive a copy of the annual statement and periodic statement regarding his transactions.

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B) He also has a right to receive information about investment policies, objectives, financial position and general affairs of the scheme.

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C) Trustees are bound disclose to unit holders any information that could adversely impact investments. Investors have the right to information regarding any adverse happening.

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D) With prior Sebi approval, AMC can be terminate by 75% of the unit holders of the scheme present and voting at a special meeting.

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E) He is eligible to receive dividend within 42 days of declaration, and the proceeds within 10 days from the date of redemption or repurchase.

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F) They can also pass a resolution to wind-up the scheme.

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G) An investor can also send complaints to Sebi, who will take up= the matter with the concerned MFs and follow them up till the issue is solved.

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H) With the consent of 75% of the unit holders they have the right to approve any changes in the close ended scheme.

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However in present world, usually no fund house takes an investor for granted, as nobody wants bad publicity.

Also, fund houses know that the Sebi is extremely serious about investor protection.

Still there is scope for more improvement.

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When it comes to quantitative rights like receiving dividend or redemption cheque on time, things are very much in place.

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However, when it comes to transparency or frequency of portfolio disclosure, things can still improve.

Transparency is a big issue in mutual fund industry.

Still there are schemes in market with strange and funny names, or the repackaged schemes where the investment objective and investment portfolio are not close to each other etc;
These can confuse investors.

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Another area which could improve is frequency of portfolio disclosure. Many Fund houses are lacking in the disclosure of portfolio twice a year, a choice given to them.

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So moral of the story is that before investing everybody should take necessary action to familiar with the scheme and at the same time should be aware of their rights and obligations.

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Are There Any Advantages of Systematic Investment In ULIPs ??

 Benefits of ulips.jpg

The impact of economic recession on life insurance companies has gone unnoticed where not only premium incomes but also the employment potential of many companies has decreased.

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However, the global slowdown and resulting unpredictable stock indices have shaken public confidence in long-term financial planning and there is visible unwillingness to purchase an insurance policy and commit oneself to pay premiums regularly over a number of years.

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Moreover, the Sensex, over the last 25 years, suffered massive crashes in 1992-93, 2000-01 and 2008-09 at eight year intervals.

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However, there was no impact on the life insurance industry on earlier occasions, when the index crashed whereas till the opening of the insurance sector, the Life Insurance Corporation was marketing traditional products, considered symbols of stability and security, immune to the vagaries of the stock market.

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Moreover, the new companies that came on the scene, trying to capitalize on the stock market boom, began marketing unit linked products, ignoring traditional products.

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However, although the Sensex had crashed three times, it had advanced from just 245 in March 1984 to 9700 in March 2009, an annual growth of 16% while stock market indices tend to increase steadily under the influence of economic growth and inflation.

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Nevertheless, under the impact of speculative forces, the growth can be uneven while investors can minimize, if not eliminate, the impact of speculative forces through systematic investment in ULIPs or mutual funds.

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Moreover, under a unit linked plan, the premiums are invested in equities and the value of the units on any day moves broadly in line with the stock index on that day.

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Suppose a person had taken out a ten year policy on March 31, 1984 and paid Rs. 1,000 every year.
Ignoring all charges and the dividend income from investments, what is the gross yield he can expect by March 1994?

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Based on the changes in Sensex, the average yield will be 17.8 per cent. πŸ™‚

If the date of commencement had been March 1985 or 1986 … or 1999, the yield to maturity at the end of ten years would have varied between 4.8 per cent and 30.3 per cent.

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And in four of the 16 cases the yield would have been negative.

The range of variation is quite wide and the chance of negative yield is 4 out of 16, or 25 per cent.

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The range will narrow down and chances of negative yield come down with increasing policy terms.

The results will be still better with quarterly or monthly modes of premium payments.

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This means that an investor in ULIPs should opt for a minimum term of 15 years and, preferably, a quarterly mode of payment.

And, having chosen a plan, he should select a fund with more than 50 per cent equity content.

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Even if the market takes a sudden plunge after the policy is taken, be not panic and allow the policy to lapse.

One should pay the next premium in time.

With a lower net asset value, he can get more units for the same premium.

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Market setbacks at the earlier stages of a policy will not significantly affect the yield to maturity.

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But any setback in the last few years before maturity can reduce it considerably.

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It is therefore advised that the policy holder should start keeping a close watch on the NAV of the relevant fund and the market indices.

If there are indications of a downtrend, he should surrender the policy and take out the cash value.

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By following the above steps one can insulate oneself, though not fully, from market fluctuations and hope to get a better return than what one can get from a traditional product.

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A lucky few may even get a very high return while the unlucky ones may end up with very low or even negative returns.

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Suppose a person had taken out a ten year policy on March 31, 1984 and paid Rs. 1,000 every year.

Ignoring all charges and the dividend income from investments, what is the gross yield he can expect by March 1994?

Based on the changes in Sensex, the average yield will be 17.8 per cent.

If the date of commencement had been March 1985 or 1986 … or 1999, the yield to maturity at the end of ten years would have varied between 4.8 per cent and 30.3 per cent.

And in four of the 16 cases the yield would have been negative.

The range of variation is quite wide and the chance of negative yield is 4 out of 16, or 25 per cent.

The range will narrow down and chances of negative yield come down with increasing policy terms.

The results will be still better with quarterly or monthly modes of premium payments.

If dividend incomes from investments and the fact that fund managers invariably outperform the market index are also taken into account, the net yield after deduction of charges may exceed the gross yield.

This means that an investor in ULIPs should opt for a minimum term of 15 years and, preferably, a quarterly mode of payment.

And, having chosen a plan, he should select a fund with more than 50 per cent equity content.

Even if the market takes a sudden plunge after the policy is taken, be not panic and allow the policy to lapse. He should pay the next premium in time. With a lower net asset value, he can get more units for the same premium.

Market setbacks at the earlier stages of a policy will not significantly affect the yield to maturity. But any setback in the last few years before maturity can reduce it considerably.

It is therefore advised that the policy holder should start keeping a close watch on the NAV of the relevant fund and the market indices. If there are indications of a downtrend, he should surrender the policy and take out the cash value.

By following the above steps one can insulate oneself, though not fully, from market fluctuations and hope to get a better return than what one can get from a traditional product.

A lucky few may even get a very high return while the unlucky ones may end up with very low or even negative returns.