Posts Tagged ‘London Stock Exchange’

Standard Chartered IDR : “Opportunity in Crisis”

Standard Chartered IDR : “Opportunity in Crisis”

By Jagannadham Thunuguntla

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The bad market conditions are putting pressure on the ongoing IPO of Standard Chartered IDR. However, if one closely observes, there is some opportunity emerging in the Standard Chartered IDR.

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What’s the trade?

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When the price of Indian IDR was fixed, the trading price of the Standard Chartered Plc share on London Stock Exchange was trading in the range of GBP 15.5.

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However, thanks to the stabilization of the global equity markets in the past 2 to 3 trading sessions, the price of the Standard Chartered Plc on London stock exchange has reached to the tune of GBP 16.82 on Thursday closing. Hence, the Indian rupee translation of the trading price in London stock exchange works out to the equivalent price of Rs 1140. As, there is 10:1 exchange rate, the effective equivalent price of Standard Chartered Indian IDR works out to Rs 114.

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If one observes, the Standard Chartered IDR issue book is getting built at the lower end of Rs 100.

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So, the institutional investors and large HNIs can take this opportunity, by simply applying for IDRs in the Indian public issue; and shorting the share in the London stock exchange. Hence, there is a spread of Rs. 14 (that is, between Rs. 114 and Rs. 100), that is 14%.

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This trade is more fascinating, especially, on the back of the fact that recently the listing days from the closure of the issue have been reduced to 12 days from the erstwhile 22 days. So, 14% is the spread available for a trade of just 12 days.

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Further, it is appearing that the IPO book will at best get barely subscribed one time. Hence, there is no risk of oversubscription. So, whoever applies is assured of allotment. Hence, as there is no spill-over risk due to oversubscription, this trade can really work well.

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It seems there is a clear 14% opportunity in just 12 days for institutions and large HNIs.

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Even if we assume that the final issue price will be in line with the Rs 104 per IDR, as applied by the Anchor investors, still there is Rs 10 spread (that is, between Rs 114 and Rs. 104), that is to the tune of about 10%.

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The couple of assumptions that need to be highlighted are:

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(a) The IDR issue will be able to get closed successfully and will not get called off; and

(b) The currency risk is properly hedged

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Conclusion

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As this is the first ever IDR issue in India, the learning curve will be steeper for every one associated in the value chain, regarding the concept and nuances of the modus operandi. As always, the “first mover advantage” can prove to be invaluable.

SEBI’s Auction Move on FPOs Impresses Marketmen :)

 

SEBI's Auction Move on FPOs Impresses Marketmen

SEBI's Auction Move on FPOs Impresses Marketmen

SEBI’s has planned to remove the cap price for the follow-on public offerings and this idea seems to be impressing market players.

SEBI has said that  it would introduce “pure auction as an additional book building mechanism for institutional investors for follow-on public offerings (FPOs).”

Analysts and market men feel that this is going to generate loads of excitement and fun for market players, as those investors who are convinced about a particular issue will invest at a higher price to seek allotment and those not-so-convinced can invest at a lower price.

Merchant bankers said it will be interesting to see how this will work as there are a few PSU FPOs likely to hit the market soon.

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PSUs likely to come out with FPOs include NMDC, MMTC, Neyveli Lignite Corporation, Rashtriya Chemicals and Fertilizers, National Fertilizers, Coal India and Engineers India

As of now, the IPO price is determined through a price band (which has a lower and upper level).

An auction or floor price is the minimum price at which bids can be made for an IPO.

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Meanwhile, merchant bankers welcomed SEBI’s announcement on Monday that exchanges could have a separate platform for Small and Medium Enterprises (SME).

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As the primary market size grows, the smaller companies are getting lost amid the big ticket IPOs.
Having such exclusive guidelines for SMEs is definitely a good idea, said merchant bankers.

SME platform SEBI on the lines of the AIM on the London Stock Exchange will be better.

Those SMEs with a paid-up capital of between Rs 10 crore and Rs 25 crore have an option of either being on the SME exchange or the main bourses.

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According to the new guidelines, SMEs should have a maximum paid up capital of Rs 25 crore for listing.

For an investor the minimum application size in an SME IPO will now be Rs 1 lakh.

Though such a limit might seem like it will prevent the retail investor of small means from investing in SME IPOs, merchant bankers said that it is a good move.

“This will allow retail investors to take more informed decisions. It will protect these investors as the chances of manipulation with respect to smaller companies are much higher. Those investors with the right amount of knowledge and liquidity will be the ones investing in these IPOs,” said Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, Head of Equity at SMC Capital.

Having the merchant bankers underwriting the IPO will make sure that they price the issue properly and also provide proper valuations.

Merchant bankers are also happy that for an SME issue the minimum number of investors is only 50 for a particular issue.

“For an issue, as of now, there has to be a minimum of 1,000 investors,” said Mr Thunuguntla.