Posts Tagged ‘liquidity crunch’

Sensex to Seek Direction from RBI’s Monetary Policy Review

Sensex to Seek Direction from RBI's Monetary Policy Review

Sensex to Seek Direction from RBI's Monetary Policy Review

Dalal Street will closely track the Reserve Bank‘s monetary policy review this week to seek direction, as weak global and domestic cues may continue to dampen sentiments in opening trade on Monday, experts say.

Besides, the expiry of the futures and option contracts this week is expected to keep the market volatile.

With global markets deteriorating and shares of Reliance Industries acting as a drag, market may open weak on Monday.

Marketmen said as valuations are overstretched, investors are now booking profit even at the slightest bad news.

Also, liquidity crunch is keeping frontline stocks under pressure.

On Friday, RIL scrips declined by 4.5 per cent.

โ€œRIL, which is already reeling under uncertainty over the ongoing court case, would face further pressure. The scrip would be a dampener on the already weak market sentiment,โ€ SMC Global Vice President Rajesh Jain said.

The Bombay Stock Exchange barometer Sensex lost three per cent, its biggest weekly fall in 11 weeks, to 16,810.81 points.

The index is up over 74 per cent so far in 2009, aided by foreign fund flows of over $14 billion.

Future Venture to Re-File for IPO Soon :)

future group

Future Venture is likely to approach Sebi again for an initial public offering soon, as the validity of the earlier approval by the market watchdog lapsed this month.

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“We are going for a fresh filing (for IPO) with Sebi,” Future Group Chairman Kishore Biyani told PTI.

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The company, which is a part of diversified Future Group, had received the Securities and Exchanges Board of India (Sebi) approval for IPO on September 4, 2008.

As per regulations, a company has to hit the capital markets within 12 months of receiving the Sebi nod.

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Last year, the company had planned to raise up to Rs 1,000 crore through a public offering of about 374 crore shares so as to fund the group’s expansion plans.

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However this time amount to be raised from the capital market would be less than the previously planned Rs 1000 crore.

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Liquidity crunch and volatility in recent times had forced many companies including Future Venture to either postpone or shelve their plans to mop up funds from the capital market.

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“The planned IPO by Future Venture was actually a by-product of the bull market.”

“After the success of Future Capital IPO last year, the Future group thought of tapping the capital market with another offer, although there was no actual necessity of fund raising,” SMC Capital Equity Head Jagannadham Thunuguntla said.

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The Future Group, which is into various businesses apart from retail, is currently looking at ways to raise funds.

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uture Venture is likely to approach Sebi again for an initial public offering soon, as the validity of the earlier approval by the market watchdog lapsed this month.

๐Ÿ™‚

“We are going for a fresh filing (for IPO) with Sebi,” Future Group Chairman Kishore Biyani told PTI.

๐Ÿ™‚

The company, which is a part of diversified Future Group, had received the Securities and Exchanges Board of India (Sebi) approval for IPO on September 4, 2008.

As per regulations, a company has to hit the capital markets within 12 months of receiving the Sebi nod.

๐Ÿ™‚

Last year, the company had planned to raise up to Rs 1,000 crore through a public offering of about 374 crore shares so as to fund the group’s expansion plans.

๐Ÿ™‚

However this time amount to be raised from the capital market would be less than the previously planned Rs 1000 crore.

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Liquidity crunch and volatility in recent times had forced many companies including Future Venture to either postpone or

Investor’s Dilemma : Are ULIPs just another Mutual Fund??

ulips

At almost every investor mind a question is generally cropped up: โ€œWhat is the difference between a ULIP and a Mutual Fund?โ€

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The reason, perhaps for the wide extent of confusion, lies largely in the way ULIPs have been sold by agents. As just another mutual fund.

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Unit Linked Insurance Policies (ULIPs) as an investment avenue are closest to mutual funds in terms of their structure and functioning.

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As is the case with mutual funds, investors in ULIPs is allotted units by the insurance company and a net asset value (NAV) is declared for the same on a daily basis.

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Similarly ULIP investors have the option of investing across various schemes similar to the ones found in the mutual funds domain, i.e. diversified equity funds, balanced funds and debt funds to name a few.

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Generally speaking, ULIPs can be termed as mutual fund schemes with an insurance component.

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Mutual Fund is a body corporate that pools the money from individual/corporate investors and invests the same on behalf of the investors /unit holders, in various investment avenues like equity shares, Government securities, Bonds, Call money markets etc., as per the pre-specified objective and distributes the profits earned from such investment.

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In India, Mutual Funds are registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI).


ULIPs vs Mutual Funds

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ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. ๐Ÿ™‚

But very long term investment, not even medium term.

Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, donโ€™t even consider a ULIP.

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Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

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ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policyโ€™s tenure.

The freedom to modify premium payments at oneโ€™s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

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In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India.

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Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

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ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge.

So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

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So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs. ๐Ÿ™‚

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.

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ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. But very long term investment, not even medium term.

Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, donโ€™t even consider a ULIP.

Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policyโ€™s tenure.

The freedom to modify premium payments at oneโ€™s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India. Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge. So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs.

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.

Companies Go Slow on Share Buy-Backs.

Companies go slow on share buy-backs

Companies go slow on share buy-backs

In a tight money market, companies that have moved to buy back their shares are going slow on these efforts either because they do not have the money or are saving it for a better use, according to analysts and executives at some of the firms.

Currently, 22 companies have ongoing offers to buy back their own shares and, according to SMC Capitals Ltd, the merchant banking arm of New Delhi-based financial services house SMC Global Securities Ltd, they have spent less than 25% of the aggregate Rs 4,559.47 crore they would have to spend if they bought back all the shares they set out to at the maximum buy-back price.

To be sure, buy-back offers are typically open for several months and many of the 22 companies still have time to repurchase their shares.

Companies buy back shares in an effort to boost investor sentiment and prop up the share price, and increase the return on equity (money for the buy-back usually comes from reserves which is part of the shareholdersโ€™ funds or equity) and earnings per share (the shares bought back are destroyed, leaving fewer shares among which the earnings have to be shared).

No companies launched buy-back programmes in 2007, when the equity markets were on a roll. Several companies, however, announced such programmes as the markets started melting last year.

Indiaโ€™s benchmark equity index, Sensex, has lost nearly 50% of its value since January 2008, in the wake of the global credit crunch and an economic slowdown.

Delhi-based real estate firm DLF Ltd, which had announced one of the biggest buy-back plans last year at a total maximum cost of Rs1,100 crore, has thus far repurchased shares worth only Rs 51.3 crore, according to SMC. The offer closes on 9 July.

โ€œThe money we have deployed in the buy-back is a reflection of the general market conditions and the liquidity crisis worldwide,โ€ said Saurabh Chawla, executive director, finance, DLF.

Similarly, Reliance Infrastructure Ltd, owned by the Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group (R-Adag), has bought back shares worth Rs806 crore in an offer capped at Rs2,000 crore, according to SMC data.

โ€œAt a time when cash is king, many companies may not be as committed to their buy-backs as they would have been otherwise,โ€ said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of equity at SMC Capitals.

Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of equity at SMC Capitals

Usually, a firm specifies a maximum price for the buy-back and a maximum amount it will utilize for the buy-back.

But it doesnโ€™t necessarily use this amount, and the buy-back happens at the prevailing market price.

โ€œIf the maximum buy-back price is Rs600, but the current market price is only Rs 300, the firm will naturally buy back at Rs 300,โ€ said Thunuguntla of SMC Capitals.

A buy-back gives investors the option of liquidating their position in a market that doesnโ€™t have too many buyers.
More read on SMC Capitals : http://www.smccapitals.com/index.htm

What are ULIPs? How is it different from Mutual funds ?

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance

At almost every investor mind a question is generally cropped up: “What is the difference between a ULIP and a Mutual Fund?”

The reason, perhaps for the wide extent of confusion, lies largely in the way ULIPs have been sold by agents. As just another mutual fund.

Unit Linked Insurance Policies (ULIPs) as an investment avenue are closest to mutual funds in terms of their structure and functioning.

As is the case with mutual funds, investors in ULIPs is allotted units by the insurance company and a net asset value (NAV) is declared for the same on a daily basis.

Similarly ULIP investors have the option of investing across various schemes similar to the ones found in the mutual funds domain, i.e. diversified equity funds, balanced funds and debt funds to name a few.

Generally speaking, ULIPs can be termed as mutual fund schemes with an insurance component.

And as you would be aware about Mutual Fund, it is a body corporate that pools the money from individual/corporate investors and invests the same on behalf of the investors /unit holders, in various investment avenues like equity shares, Government securities, Bonds, Call money markets etc., as per the pre-specified objective and distributes the profits earned from such investment.

In India, Mutual Funds are registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI).

ULIPs vs Mutual Funds

ULIPs

Mutual Funds

Investment amounts

Determined by the investor and can be modified as well

Minimum investment amounts are determined by the fund house

Expenses

No upper limits, expenses determined by the insurance company

Upper limits for expenses chargeable to investors have been set by the regulator

Portfolio disclosure

Not mandatory*

Quarterly disclosures are mandatory

Modifying asset allocation

Generally permitted for free or at a nominal cost

Entry/exit loads have to be borne by the investor

Tax benefits

Section 80C benefits are available on all ULIP investments

Section 80C benefits are available only on investments in tax-saving funds

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. But very long term investment, not even medium term.Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, don’t even consider a ULIP.

Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

ULIPs invest for the long term, as they expect investors to stay for the long term. And the purpose of a ULIP is also different build assets through a pension plan, retirement plan or child plan. All of which, need very long term investing, say 10-15 years or even more.

ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policy’s tenure.

For example an individual with access to surplus funds can enhance the contribution thereby ensuring that his surplus funds are gainfully invested; conversely an individual faced with a liquidity crunch has the option of paying a lower amount (the difference being adjusted in the accumulated value of his ULIP).

The freedom to modify premium payments at one’s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India. Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

Mutual fund houses are required to statutorily declare their portfolios on a quarterly basis, albeit most fund houses do so on a monthly basis. Investors get the opportunity to see where their monies are being invested and how they have been managed by studying the portfolio.

*There is lack of consensus on whether ULIPs are required to disclose their portfolios. While some insurers claim that disclosing portfolios on a quarterly basis is mandatory, others state that there is no legal obligation to do so.

ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge. So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs.

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.