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Interest Rate Futures Section – Final Part :)

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Hello Friends, we are here with the Final Part of our Interest Rate Futures educational section.
We would touch upon the benefits of the Interest Rate Futures and the future scenario related to it.

Here we go :

Key benefits of Interest Rate Futures:

Directional trading

As there is an inverse relationship between interest rate movement and underlying bond prices, so if one has strong view that the interest rates will rise in near future then he can take short position in IRF contracts and can be benefited from the falling futures bond prices.

Hedging portfolio

The holders of the GOI securities are exposed to risk of rising interest rates which in turn results in the reduction in the value of the portfolio.

So in order to protect against a fall in the value of the portfolio they can take short position in IRF.

Calendar spread trading

This spread is also known as an inter-delivery spread.

It is the simultaneous purchase of one delivery month of a given futures contract and the sale of another delivery month of the same underlying on the same exchange.

For example:

Buying a September 09 and simultaneously selling a December 09 contract.
A market participant can profit as the price difference between the two contracts widens.

The either case can also be possible.

Reduce the duration of portfolio:

Bonds with longer maturities are more sensitive to interest rate changes, and bond portfolio with longer duration will be more exposed to the vulnerability of the movement in interest rate.

So portfolio manager who is concerned about the rise in the short term interest rate risk would like to reduce the duration of the portfolio.

By entering into the IRF contract to NSE, the portfolio manager can reduce duration of the portfolio.

Arbitraging between cash and futures market:

Arbitrage is the price difference between the bond prices in underlying bond market and IRF contract without any view about the interest rate movement.

One can earn the risk-less profit from realizing arbitrage opportunity and entering into the IRF contract traded on NSE by initiating cash and carry trade.

Responses After launch:

After the launch of currency futures in August 2008, Interest-rate futures are the first major product to be introduced in India.

The interest rate futures began on August 31,2009 clocking trading volumes of Rs 276 crore in their first day of trade.

Market participants responded passionately to the product launch on the first day.

In around five hours of trading time available after inauguration, 1,475 trades were recorded resulting in 14,559 contracts being traded at a total value of Rs 267.31 crore.

In the beginning only two quarters has been introduced out of four, among which December 2009 was the most active with 13,789 contracts which has been traded actively.

There are nearly 638 members registered for this new product, out of which 21 are banks and there contribution to the total gross volume was 32.48 percent.

Future scenario:

BSE had received regulatory approval for interest rates futures and would launch in 8-10 weeks.

The Multi Commodity Exchange’s foreign exchange derivatives bourse has sought permission to launch trade in interest rate futures.

🙂

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