Posts Tagged ‘Insurance companies’

ULIPs to be Commission Free after April 1, 2011 :)

ULIPs to be Commission Free after April 1, 2011

ULIPs to be Commission Free after April 1, 2011

Those investing in Unit Linked Insurance Plans (ULIPs) are set to be secured of this burden of paying commission after April 2011 even though consumers buying pure-life insurance products will have to go on paying commission to sellers of these policies.

🙂

However this is said :

– to help improve returns to investors in ULIPs,

-curb mis-selling and

– help raise insurance penetration by having a modest commission on pure insurance products in turn creating incentives for sellers.

🙂

Further, it will also pave the way for a load-free regime on most financial products after April 1, 2011.


Moreover, the suggestion to cut commissions from the policy-holders” premium is against the insurance regulator IRDA‘s demand to keep the existing structure intact
while agents are entitled to get a commission of upto :

– 40% of the premium in the first year,

– 7.5% in the second year and

– 5% in the third year and thereafter.

🙂

Further, if the panel”s proposal passes muster with the HLCC, upfront commissions embedded in the ULIP premium will be cut to 15% by April and 7% by October next year.

While, ULIPs will be load-free by April 1, 2011 just like mutual
funds and pension products under the new pension scheme
and insurance companies will help their agent”s transit to a
fee-based model instead of a commission based model.

🙂

Additionally, sellers of term insurance products with pure lifecover sans investment will have to reconcile to lower commissions which will be cut to 5% of the premium after April1, 2011 and will continue till penetration reaches the targets set by the government.

🙂

Interest Rate Futures Section – Final Part :)

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Interest Rate Futures Section Final Part

Hello Friends, we are here with the Final Part of our Interest Rate Futures educational section.
We would touch upon the benefits of the Interest Rate Futures and the future scenario related to it.

Here we go :

Key benefits of Interest Rate Futures:

Directional trading

As there is an inverse relationship between interest rate movement and underlying bond prices, so if one has strong view that the interest rates will rise in near future then he can take short position in IRF contracts and can be benefited from the falling futures bond prices.

Hedging portfolio

The holders of the GOI securities are exposed to risk of rising interest rates which in turn results in the reduction in the value of the portfolio.

So in order to protect against a fall in the value of the portfolio they can take short position in IRF.

Calendar spread trading

This spread is also known as an inter-delivery spread.

It is the simultaneous purchase of one delivery month of a given futures contract and the sale of another delivery month of the same underlying on the same exchange.

For example:

Buying a September 09 and simultaneously selling a December 09 contract.
A market participant can profit as the price difference between the two contracts widens.

The either case can also be possible.

Reduce the duration of portfolio:

Bonds with longer maturities are more sensitive to interest rate changes, and bond portfolio with longer duration will be more exposed to the vulnerability of the movement in interest rate.

So portfolio manager who is concerned about the rise in the short term interest rate risk would like to reduce the duration of the portfolio.

By entering into the IRF contract to NSE, the portfolio manager can reduce duration of the portfolio.

Arbitraging between cash and futures market:

Arbitrage is the price difference between the bond prices in underlying bond market and IRF contract without any view about the interest rate movement.

One can earn the risk-less profit from realizing arbitrage opportunity and entering into the IRF contract traded on NSE by initiating cash and carry trade.

Responses After launch:

After the launch of currency futures in August 2008, Interest-rate futures are the first major product to be introduced in India.

The interest rate futures began on August 31,2009 clocking trading volumes of Rs 276 crore in their first day of trade.

Market participants responded passionately to the product launch on the first day.

In around five hours of trading time available after inauguration, 1,475 trades were recorded resulting in 14,559 contracts being traded at a total value of Rs 267.31 crore.

In the beginning only two quarters has been introduced out of four, among which December 2009 was the most active with 13,789 contracts which has been traded actively.

There are nearly 638 members registered for this new product, out of which 21 are banks and there contribution to the total gross volume was 32.48 percent.

Future scenario:

BSE had received regulatory approval for interest rates futures and would launch in 8-10 weeks.

The Multi Commodity Exchange’s foreign exchange derivatives bourse has sought permission to launch trade in interest rate futures.

🙂

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INTEREST RATE FUTURES – Part 2

Hello Friends, just an extension of our previous blog on interest rates futures where we touched upon the topic of interest rates future and what is it exactly.

Now we would understand that why is there need for interst rate futures and many more related aspects in this regard.

Here we go :

Why Interest rate futures?

Why Interest rate futures?

Why Interest rate futures?

The risk associated with the interest rate is uncertain and it never has been constant in the past, infact it would not remain constant in future also.

The volatility of interest rates has increased manifold in the last couple of years and recorded 17.40% in 2008 as compared to 8.51% in 2007.

This high fluctuation in volatility increases risk and requires tools to manage those risks.

Interest rate futures are the product for managing such interest rate risk.

🙂

Backbone of Interest Rate Future:

NSE, India’s largest stock exchange, began interest rate futures and offers the same reliable features as it provide to its other products with the following advantages:

Standardization and flexibility

•Price transparency and liquidity

•Leverage effect due to a wider collateral management

•Advance trading software and technological edge

•Centralized clearing supported by guaranteed settlement

🙂

Who can be a part of it?

The major market participants of interest rate futures are

•Banks and Primary Dealers

• Mutual Funds and Insurance Companies

• Corporate Houses and Financial Institutions,

•FIIs and NRIs

• Member Brokers and Retail Investors.

In Final part of this topic (which we would cover in our next blog), we would throw light on the benefits of the Interest Rate Futures and the future scenario related to Interest rate futures.

🙂

Stay Tuned 😉

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Investor’s Dilemma : Are ULIPs just another Mutual Fund??

ulips

At almost every investor mind a question is generally cropped up: “What is the difference between a ULIP and a Mutual Fund?”

🙂

The reason, perhaps for the wide extent of confusion, lies largely in the way ULIPs have been sold by agents. As just another mutual fund.

🙂

Unit Linked Insurance Policies (ULIPs) as an investment avenue are closest to mutual funds in terms of their structure and functioning.

🙂

As is the case with mutual funds, investors in ULIPs is allotted units by the insurance company and a net asset value (NAV) is declared for the same on a daily basis.

🙂

Similarly ULIP investors have the option of investing across various schemes similar to the ones found in the mutual funds domain, i.e. diversified equity funds, balanced funds and debt funds to name a few.

🙂

Generally speaking, ULIPs can be termed as mutual fund schemes with an insurance component.

🙂

Mutual Fund is a body corporate that pools the money from individual/corporate investors and invests the same on behalf of the investors /unit holders, in various investment avenues like equity shares, Government securities, Bonds, Call money markets etc., as per the pre-specified objective and distributes the profits earned from such investment.

🙂

In India, Mutual Funds are registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI).


ULIPs vs Mutual Funds

🙂

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. 🙂

But very long term investment, not even medium term.

Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, don’t even consider a ULIP.

🙂

Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

🙂

ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policy’s tenure.

The freedom to modify premium payments at one’s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

😉

In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India.

🙂

Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

🙂

ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge.

So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

🙂

So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs. 🙂

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.

🙂

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. But very long term investment, not even medium term.

Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, don’t even consider a ULIP.

Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policy’s tenure.

The freedom to modify premium payments at one’s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India. Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge. So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs.

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.

What are ULIPs? How is it different from Mutual funds ?

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance

At almost every investor mind a question is generally cropped up: “What is the difference between a ULIP and a Mutual Fund?”

The reason, perhaps for the wide extent of confusion, lies largely in the way ULIPs have been sold by agents. As just another mutual fund.

Unit Linked Insurance Policies (ULIPs) as an investment avenue are closest to mutual funds in terms of their structure and functioning.

As is the case with mutual funds, investors in ULIPs is allotted units by the insurance company and a net asset value (NAV) is declared for the same on a daily basis.

Similarly ULIP investors have the option of investing across various schemes similar to the ones found in the mutual funds domain, i.e. diversified equity funds, balanced funds and debt funds to name a few.

Generally speaking, ULIPs can be termed as mutual fund schemes with an insurance component.

And as you would be aware about Mutual Fund, it is a body corporate that pools the money from individual/corporate investors and invests the same on behalf of the investors /unit holders, in various investment avenues like equity shares, Government securities, Bonds, Call money markets etc., as per the pre-specified objective and distributes the profits earned from such investment.

In India, Mutual Funds are registered with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI).

ULIPs vs Mutual Funds

ULIPs

Mutual Funds

Investment amounts

Determined by the investor and can be modified as well

Minimum investment amounts are determined by the fund house

Expenses

No upper limits, expenses determined by the insurance company

Upper limits for expenses chargeable to investors have been set by the regulator

Portfolio disclosure

Not mandatory*

Quarterly disclosures are mandatory

Modifying asset allocation

Generally permitted for free or at a nominal cost

Entry/exit loads have to be borne by the investor

Tax benefits

Section 80C benefits are available on all ULIP investments

Section 80C benefits are available only on investments in tax-saving funds

ULIPs are a mix of investment and insurance. But very long term investment, not even medium term.Insurance companies themselves admit, that if your investment horizon is anything less than 7 years, don’t even consider a ULIP.

Charge structure in a ULIP is vastly different from a mutual fund.

ULIPs invest for the long term, as they expect investors to stay for the long term. And the purpose of a ULIP is also different build assets through a pension plan, retirement plan or child plan. All of which, need very long term investing, say 10-15 years or even more.

ULIP investors also have the flexibility to alter the premium amounts during the policy’s tenure.

For example an individual with access to surplus funds can enhance the contribution thereby ensuring that his surplus funds are gainfully invested; conversely an individual faced with a liquidity crunch has the option of paying a lower amount (the difference being adjusted in the accumulated value of his ULIP).

The freedom to modify premium payments at one’s convenience clearly gives ULIP investors an edge over their mutual fund counterparts.

In mutual fund investments, expenses charged for various activities like fund management, sales and marketing, administration among others are subject to pre-determined upper limits as prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Board of India. Insurance companies have a free hand in levying expenses on their ULIP products with no upper limits being prescribed by the regulator, i.e. the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority.

Mutual fund houses are required to statutorily declare their portfolios on a quarterly basis, albeit most fund houses do so on a monthly basis. Investors get the opportunity to see where their monies are being invested and how they have been managed by studying the portfolio.

*There is lack of consensus on whether ULIPs are required to disclose their portfolios. While some insurers claim that disclosing portfolios on a quarterly basis is mandatory, others state that there is no legal obligation to do so.

ULIPs also allow you to switch from debt to equity within the same scheme, at no extra charge. So if you want to get the benefits of long term investment and risk cover in one single product, ULIP is the product for you.

So it is not an issue, of whether a mutual fund is better or a ULIP. It is about your need.

Both can co-exist in your basket of needs.

So identify your needs with a financial planner and then pick the product suitable for you.