Posts Tagged ‘GDP growth’

Weekly Update 7th – 11th June

Unlike developed economies market that closed in red, our market closed in the positive on the back of robust GDP growth of 7.4% in the year ending March 2010 driven by solid rebound in manufacturing activity.

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Auto & Cement sales numbers also joyed the markets. Good monsoon which is likely to be in range of 98% of the long term average will help in entailing inflation and will boost rural economy, a major factor for the overall growth of the economy kept the markets on a strong foot in the week gone by.

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On the contrary, bad news continued from the rest of the world. Export led recovery is losing momentum in Japan. Manufactures are planning to increase production at a slower pace in the coming months in view of the cut in European government expenditures that may damp sales of Japanese goods over time. Unemployment is increasing and job prospects are worsening together with cuts in household spending.

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Euorpean region economy which is struggling to gather strength after the debt crisis and has sought to cut expenditure got another jolt after Hungary said its economy is in a “very grave” situation, reigniting concern the region’s debt crisis is spreading. Hungary Prime Minister said that talk of a default is “not an exaggeration” because a previous administration “manipulated” figures.

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The country was bailed out with a 20 billion-euro ($24 billion) aid package from the European Union and International Monetary Fund in 2008. U.S. markets saw Indices dropping to four months low after the lower than forecast payroll numbers for the month of May. However the positive news in the payroll survey was in earnings, the workweek, and production hours. Wage inflation picked up with a 0.3 percent rise in May, following a 0.1 percent advance the month before.

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The average workweek for all workers edged up to 34.2 hours from 34.1 hours in April. The gain point out to future hirings and suggests increase in industrial production for the month.

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Overall trend of world stock markets is still down though the markets tried to take a recovery intra week but the US and European markets spoiled the party.

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Base metal commodities did not bounce even slightly which went to show that stock markets tried a recovery without participation of industrial commodities.

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Nifty faces resistance between 5150-5180 levels and Sensex between 17200-17400 levels.

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Sentiments are still very fragile and investors are very watchful in commodity.

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Technically, base metals and energy appear oversold; hence they may generate some lower level buying. However, one should not judge it as a major one sided rally in these commodities as fears on European economy is still hovering. Even, negative outcome of economic data’s from various economies is further indicating slowdown in economic activities. If mercury goes high further and we see further decline in crude and other inventories in US, then it will stimulate buying in crude oil. Natural gas has already seen good short covering in the prices in past few weeks, can witness more buying for the same reason.

Weekly Update 31st May – 4th June

Markets posted gains in the week gone by as the investors felt that stocks are battered down harshly in the short run. Buying came in Asian stocks on speculation that China will rein its effort to cool its economy as European debt crisis threatens a global recovery. Concerns also rose that the banks in Spain may face further losses after IMF urged Spain to do more to overhaul its ailing banking sector. The regulator is pushing ailing banks to merge with stronger partners.

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US Treasury Secretary Geithner said that US, China along with India, Brazil and other emerging economies are experiencing stronger recovery as compared to earlier anticipation and are positioned well to face the challenges from the European Nations. The OECD revised India’s GDP growth forecast for 2010 to 8.2% from its earlier estimate of 7.3%. It also raised the growth forecast for 2011 to 8.5% from its earlier estimate of 7.6%. The OECD also said that underlying inflationary pressures are likely to persist given the strong outlook for demand. IMF pegged India’s GDP growth forecast at 8.75% in calendar 2010 and 8.5% in calendar 2011 on expectations of strengthening of domestic demand. Back at home, RBI in order to ensure optimum liquidity in the system so that the public and private sector credit demands are met, eased credit lines for the banks.

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Banks can now borrow additional 0.5% of their net demand and time liabilities from the Central Bank under the repurchase agreement till 2 July 2010. In addition, RBI said that as an adhoc measure, banks can seek a waiver for any shortfall in maintenance of the prescribed 25% Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR) while availing the temporary facility. This step is taken by the RBI in view of the temporary liquidity pressure in the market because of the 3G auction and advance tax payments in the coming days. Talking about the much awaited Indian monsoon, the arrival is expected to be delayed by three days after tropical cyclone laila stalled its progress.

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Inspite of the big rally in last three days, overall trend of world stock markets is still down. Even the base metal commodities including Crude saw a rally but could not sustain at higher levels. Rupee which had crossed 47.70 levels intraday week came down to 46.30. Volatility is expected to remain high. Nifty faces resistance between 5100-5150 levels and Sensex between 17000-17200 levels.

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Persistent fear about the European region’s sovereign debt situation may keep buying intact in bullions. Commodity market is still volatile and jittery as crisis is still looming over EU nations. However, satisfactory first-quarter economic figures from the prominent Asian countries viz., China, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan and Malaysia will try to offset steep decline in base metals and energy complex.

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Furthermore, the week is full of event risk as well as many nations are coming with their first quarter GDP data, if any improvement occurs, it will stimulate buying in base metal and energy section. Dollar index, which is on track to give its best monthly performance since October, 2008 is likely to trade in a range in short run.

HOW IMPORTANT IS INTEREST RATE?

Essentially, interest is nothing more than the cost someone pays for the use of someone else’s money. In India, an individual willing to purchase a home uses bank’s money (through a mortgage) and in return pays interest to the bank for the privilege or the credit card user borrows money for the short term in order to buy something right away. But the very question that comes to everyone’s mind is how to determine where the rates are heading & what impact will it have?

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So in order to find where the interest rates are heading all one needs to do is to look at the deposits & loans advances of the banks. If banks credit growth is more than its deposits then banks may raise the deposit rates or may increase the lending rates in order to match the asset & liability mismatch. When the Central Bank (RBI) feels that the credit growth has started picking up & is higher than its target levels, RBI tinkers with its policy rates gives signals to the commercial banks to review the interest rates be it on the deposit front or on the lending front.

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Effects of the rising interest rates On individuals

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The first indirect effect of an increased rate is that banks increase the rates that they charge their customers to borrow money. Individuals are affected through increases to credit card and mortgage interest rates, especially if they carry a floating interest rate. This has the effect of decreasing the amount of money consumers can spend. After all, people still have to pay their EMI’s, and when these installments become more expensive, households are left with less disposable income.

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On the Corporates financials

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Corporates too borrow money from banks to run and expand their operations. When the banks make borrowing more expensive, corporates may  not borrow at all or may not borrow at the same pace that they were doing when the rates were lower. Less business spending can slow down the growth of a company, resulting in decreases in profit.

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Even businesses are also indirectly affected as a result of the actions of the individual consumers as individuals are left with less disposable income which affects the company’s top & bottom lines (that is, revenue and profits). Apart from having an indirect affect businesses are affected in a more direct way as well.

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On GDP Growth

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The government essentially has two weapons in its arsenal to help guide the economy towards a path of stable growth without excessive inflation; monetary policy and fiscal policy. Fiscal policy comes from the government in the form of taxation and federal budgeting policies. While fiscal policy can be very effective in specific cases to spur growth in the economy, most market watchers look to monetary policy to do most of the heavy lifting in keeping the economy in a stable growth pattern. Monetary policy is defined as any action to limit or increase the amount of money that is circulating in the economy. That means the central bank (RBI) can make money easier or harder to come by, thereby encouraging spending to spur the economy and constricting access to capital when growth rates seem to be approaching unsustainable levels.

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Stock Price Effects

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Clearly, changes in the rates affect the behavior of consumers and business; hence the stock market is also affected. Remember that one method of valuing a company is to take the sum of all the expected future cash flows from that company discounted back to the present. To arrive at a stock’s price, take the sum of the future discounted cash flow and divide it by the number of shares available. This price fluctuates as a result of the different expectations that people have about the company at different times and are willing to buy or sell shares at different prices. If the company is seen as cutting back on its growth spending or is making less profit – either through higher debt expenses or less revenue from consumers then, the estimated amount of future cash flows will drop. All else being equal, this will lower the price of the company’s stock.

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Investment Effects

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With a lowered expectation in the growth and future cash flows of the company, investors will not get as much growth from stock price appreciation, making stock ownership less desirable. Furthermore, investing in stocks can be viewed as too risky as compared to other investments. When the central bank raises its rate, newly offered government securities, such T- bills and bonds, are often viewed as the safest investments and will usually experience a corresponding increase in interest rates. In other words, the “risk-free” rate of return goes up, making these investments more desirable.

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Conclusion

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We should keep in mind, however, that these factors and results are all interrelated. What we described above are very broad interactions, which can play out in innumerable ways. Interest rates are not the only determinant of stock prices and there are many considerations that go into stock prices and the general trend of the market – an increased interest rate is only one of them. Therefore, one can never say with confidence that an interest rate hike will have an overall negative effect on stock prices.

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Stay Tuned for More Updates :)

Weekly Update of The Market (1st – 5th February) Part 1

Hello Friends, here, we bring you the weekly overview of the Indian as well as of the Global economy and along with the latest global business and industry updates.

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Weekly Update of The Market (1st - 5th February) Part 1

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A bout of volatility was witnessed in the domestic market throughout the week due to

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1.  F&O expiry,

2.  unfavorable global cues because of gloomy earnings forecast,

3.  anxiety about China‘s monetary tightening,

4.  the deteriorating finances of countries ranging from Greece to Japan and

5.  India’s central bank‘s decision to raise the CRR to 5.75.

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🙂

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But on later days of the week, US Federal Reserve’s decision to keep interest rates unchanged boosted sentiments of global markets.

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Closer home, investors also heaved a sigh of relief as the central bank kept key interest rates unchanged at the quarterly policy review indicating that it would maintain a balance between price stability and growth and raised its GDP growth projection for the current fiscal to 7.5 %.

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The RBI at its quarterly monetary policy review raised CRR by 75 basis points to suck out excess liquidity from the banking system to the tune of Rs 36000 crore.

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On the flip side, the challenges that RBI foresees for the economy is fiscal consolidation.

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The central bank lifted its wholesale price index inflation forecast for the end of the fiscal year in March 2010 to 8.5% from its earlier forecast of 6.5%.

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RBI also said it expected inflation to moderate starting in July 2010, assuming a normal monsoon and global oil prices holding at current levels.

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Moreover, US Federal Reserve too maintained interest rates at near zero levels and vowed to do so for an extended period of time.

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Additionally, it also signaled its intention of unwinding the massive monetary stimulus that it had undertaken during the peak of the crisis.

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🙂

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Stay Tuned for More on weekly updates.

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Note : For More Latest Industry, Stock Market and Economy News and Updates, please click here

Govt. Pegged Economic Growth At 7.75 Percent

Govt. Pegged Economic Growth At 7.75 Percent

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The government today pegged economic growth for the current fiscal at 7.75 per cent, higher than all previous estimates, but said high food inflation remained a cause for concern.

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Moreover, Pranab Mukherjee also said that the government could unload surplus wheat and rice stocks for open market sale.

“There are enough wheat and rice stocks. Therefore, it is proposed to make open market sale for unloading of surplus stock,” he said.

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The food inflation after surging to 19.83 per cent in the third week of December softened to 18.22% as of the week ended December 26.

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The wholesale price based inflation was 19.835 in the previous week while potato remained costly increasing as much as 110% over the last year.

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This was followed by pulses whose prices jumped by 42.21% while vegetables turned expensive by 30.97% and onion prices rose by 40.07% on yearly basis.

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“A major area of concern is high food inflation; therefore collaborative efforts of the central and state governments are required to tackle this problem” Mukherjee said at the meeting.

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Economic growth stood at 7 per cent during the first half of the current fiscal, Mukherjee said.

He pegged GDP growth for the whole fiscal at around 7.75 per cent – a number that exceeds the initial estimates of the government as well as the RBI.

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Prime Minister Manmohan Singh last month stated that returning to a speedy expansion pace after a slow 2008 due to the global economic crisis; economy is expected to rise by 7% or a little more in the current fiscal.

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Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian stocks rose, extending the benchmark index’s longest string of gains in five weeks, after the government approved a plan to sell more shares in state- controlled companies, helping it raise funds to boost spending.

MMTC Ltd., India’s biggest state-owned trading company, surged 20 percent, the most in 10 months.

Rico Auto Industries Ltd., an auto component maker that supplies General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co., climbed 5.1 percent after workers ended a 45-day strike.

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The Bombay Stock Exchange’s Sensitive Index, or Sensex, rose 94.38, or 0.6 percent, to 16,158.28.
The measure this week gained 1.7 percent, snapping two weeks of losses.

The S&P CNX Nifty Index on the National Stock Exchange rose 0.6 percent to 4,796.15.
The BSE 200 Index added 1.1 percent to 2,011.08.

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“The disinvestment move will help moderate India’s fiscal deficit,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of equities at SMC Capitals Ltd. in New Delhi.

“Also, it may help in higher GDP growth led by increased government spending.”

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MMTC soared 20 percent to 36,146.85 rupees, the most since Dec. 17.
State Trading Corp., the No. 2, leapt 15 percent to 353.6 rupees.

NMDC Ltd., India’s largest iron-ore producer, climbed 10 percent to 338 rupees. 

Hindustan Copper Ltd., India’s biggest copper miner, 99.59 percent state-owned, gained 10 percent to 256.35 rupees.

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Budget Deficit

The government owns 99.33 percent in MMTC and 91.02 percent in State Trading, while it holds 98.38 percent in NMDC, according to filings to the Bombay Stock Exchange.

The government will use the money raised from the sale of shares of state companies for social spending.

India’s fiscal deficit reached 6 percent of gross domestic product in the year ended March 31, surpassing the 2.5 percent government target.

The key Sensitive stock index has more than doubled from this year’s lowest level, in March.

Govt’s stand to sell state assets and accept more overseas funds into insurance and banking, has strengthened, after Prime Minister Manmohan Singh resounding re-election victory in May.

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US Recession has Ended, Economy Growing Again : Economists

US Recession has Ended, Economy Growing Again

US Recession has Ended, Economy Growing Again

The worst US recession since the Great Depression has ended, but weak household spending as the labour market struggles to create jobs will slow the pace of the economy’s recovery, according to a survey released this month.

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The survey released by the National Association of Business Economists found that  80% of the respondents believed the economy was growing again after four straight quarters of declines.

Experts believe that the recession has ended, but that the economic recovery is likely to be slow.

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The current recession that started in December 2007 is the longest and deepest since the 1930s.

It was triggered by the collapse of the US housing market and the ensuing global credit crisis.

The NABE survey, conducted in September, predicted real GDP growth expanding at a 2.9% pace over the second half of this year.

Output for the whole of 2009 is expected to contract 2.5% and next year, rebound to 2.6%.

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Much of the anticipated recovery was seen driven by businesses rebuilding their inventories after aggressively reducing unwanted stocks of unsold goods to match weak demand.

Investment in the residential market would also add to growth, with most respondents in the survey convinced that housing market downturn was close to coming to an end.

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The survey predicted that the unemployment rate would rise to 10% in the first quarter of 2010 and edge down to 9.5% by the end of that year.

The labor market was not expected to regain most the jobs destroyed in the current recession until 2012 or beyond.

However, the weak labour market would continue to slow down the recovery.

Labour market slack, combined with weak wage growth, meant inflation would not be an obstacle to the economic recovery.

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