Posts Tagged ‘economies’

Weekly Update 12th – 16th July

Stocks in world markets saw huge gains as investors viewed that the recent correction out of fear of double-dip recession in advanced economies has actually overlooked improving outlook for the company’s earnings. Investors sitting on the sidelines bought stocks with the upward revision in earnings estimates for U.S. companies. The gains in markets got a further boost after China said that it will keep a moderately loose policy and South Korea raised interest rates.

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Belief of Asian and Emerging nations will be able to withstand the storm coming from advanced economies rose with the interest rate increases in India, South Korea, Taiwan and Malaysia. The European Central Bank left interest rates unchanged as the sovereign debt crisis are still posing a serious threat to regions recovery.

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The IMF raised its forecast for global growth to 4.6 percent in 2010, the biggest gain since 2007, compared with an April projection of 4.2 percent reflecting a stronger than expected recovery in first half and at the same time giving warning that financial market turmoil has increased the risks to the recovery. However, IMF has not revised the next year growth projections of 4.3 percent. The IMF urged developed economies governments to commit to implementing “credible” plans to lower their deficits over the medium term, including the adoption of binding, multiyear targets and said that they don’t need to start fiscal tightening before 2011. It said that monetary policy in advanced economies can remain “highly accommodative for the foreseeable future,” because inflation is expected to remain “subdued,” helping mitigate the effects of fiscal consolidation on growth. The growth forecast for emerging markets was raised to 6.8 percent, from 6.3 percent in April.

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The fastest growth rate will be China’s 10.5 percent, followed by India’s 9.4 percent and Brazil’s 7.1 percent, the fund said. On the domestic front with the recent improved outlook in the monsoon situation and expectation of strong double digit gain in Index of Industrial production would keep the markets on a upbeat note. The result season that is going to start in the coming week and guidance by the companies for the rest of the year is further expected to set the momentum of the markets.

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Indian stock markets are in a clear uptrend though other world markets which were in a downtrend took a sharp counter rally from lower levels. We will have to wait and watch whether the rally which has started in other markets can sustain or not..

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Nifty has support between 5250-5200 levels and Sensex between 17500-17300 levels.

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Volatility is spreading in entire commodity complex and thus investors are keeping a tight vigil on relative changes to find the best value. Fundamentals of Asian countries are still constructive but it is Euro zone which is still giving red signals. For the time being, commodities should move in a range. Later half of the week is full of event risk as some important data’s from US, UK, Japan etc. can speak about the health of economy, which may provide some much needed direction to the commodities. In NCDEX, volume of July contract is shifting towards August contract, hence some volatility in premium is expected in near term.
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Weekly Update 7th – 11th June

Unlike developed economies market that closed in red, our market closed in the positive on the back of robust GDP growth of 7.4% in the year ending March 2010 driven by solid rebound in manufacturing activity.

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Auto & Cement sales numbers also joyed the markets. Good monsoon which is likely to be in range of 98% of the long term average will help in entailing inflation and will boost rural economy, a major factor for the overall growth of the economy kept the markets on a strong foot in the week gone by.

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On the contrary, bad news continued from the rest of the world. Export led recovery is losing momentum in Japan. Manufactures are planning to increase production at a slower pace in the coming months in view of the cut in European government expenditures that may damp sales of Japanese goods over time. Unemployment is increasing and job prospects are worsening together with cuts in household spending.

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Euorpean region economy which is struggling to gather strength after the debt crisis and has sought to cut expenditure got another jolt after Hungary said its economy is in a “very grave” situation, reigniting concern the region’s debt crisis is spreading. Hungary Prime Minister said that talk of a default is “not an exaggeration” because a previous administration “manipulated” figures.

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The country was bailed out with a 20 billion-euro ($24 billion) aid package from the European Union and International Monetary Fund in 2008. U.S. markets saw Indices dropping to four months low after the lower than forecast payroll numbers for the month of May. However the positive news in the payroll survey was in earnings, the workweek, and production hours. Wage inflation picked up with a 0.3 percent rise in May, following a 0.1 percent advance the month before.

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The average workweek for all workers edged up to 34.2 hours from 34.1 hours in April. The gain point out to future hirings and suggests increase in industrial production for the month.

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Overall trend of world stock markets is still down though the markets tried to take a recovery intra week but the US and European markets spoiled the party.

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Base metal commodities did not bounce even slightly which went to show that stock markets tried a recovery without participation of industrial commodities.

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Nifty faces resistance between 5150-5180 levels and Sensex between 17200-17400 levels.

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Sentiments are still very fragile and investors are very watchful in commodity.

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Technically, base metals and energy appear oversold; hence they may generate some lower level buying. However, one should not judge it as a major one sided rally in these commodities as fears on European economy is still hovering. Even, negative outcome of economic data’s from various economies is further indicating slowdown in economic activities. If mercury goes high further and we see further decline in crude and other inventories in US, then it will stimulate buying in crude oil. Natural gas has already seen good short covering in the prices in past few weeks, can witness more buying for the same reason.

Northern Region – Largest Contributor to the GDP :)

north-india

North India - Largest Contributor to the GDP

CII report states that although the economic growth in the region has underperformed the national average, the Northern Region continued to be the largest contributor to the GDP at 27.5% in 2007-08.

However, it said that it clocked a CAGR of 6.2% against 6.5% nationally while the under performance had been witnessed across primary and tertiary sectors.

Moreover, the northern region has not been able to capitalize on its traditional stronghold –agriculture while it has also not been able to capitalize on the opportunities in the service sector like the other regions.

One of the key reasons of under performance in the primary sector has been slow growth rates witnessed by two of the largest agrarian states in the region – Uttar Pradesh and Punjab, which contribute 57.5 per cent to the region’s primary sector.

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Performance of the northern region has been reasonably good in the secondary sector, driven to a large extent by growth in the construction sector.

Construction, on the other hand, is also the fastest growing sub sector for the region, CAGR of 12.6% over 1999-00 to 2007-08

Other fastest growing sub sectors for the region are transport, storage and communication; Banking & insurance, real estate, ownership of dwellings & business services.

Discussing the state economies, CII offical said that Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan and Delhi are the three largest economies in the region.

Chandigarh, Uttarakhand and Haryana are the three fastest growing economies in the region.

All northern region state economies have witnessed declining contribution from the primary sector.

The greatest increase in percentage contribution of the secondary sector has been in Uttarakhand, 15 per cent points.

Similarly the contribution of the tertiary sector has witnessed greatest increase in Haryana, 10 per cent points, he said.

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G-5, G-8..Not Anymore..Its G-20 Now !!

G20-world-economy

For the world, apparently, eight is no longer enough.

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The G-8 group of powerhouse economies, which expanded from the original G-5 one by one over three decades, stepped off center stage Friday with the ascension of the G-20 into the role of overseeing the global economy.

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The Group of 20 will take on the role of caretakers of the global economy.

The shift toward multilateral decision-making is sure to please some emerging economies — China and India in particular — and irritate those Americans who believe the United States shouldn’t be handing off its power to international institutions.

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Heading into the second day of a summit aimed at ensuring the world economy emerges from its worst recession in generations with better safeguards against another crisis, the G20 also vowed to keep emergency economic support in place until a recovery is secured, according to the draft obtained by Reuters.

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The document said G20 countries had a “responsibility to the community of nations to assure the overall health of the global economy” and pledged to try to secure next year a deal in long-running world trade talks.

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Larger G-20 would take over — a council that, by simple virtue of a membership that unites more than 80 percent of the global economy, and would be a force to be reckoned with.

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The group, which also accounts for 90 per cent of the world’s economic output, also agreed to rein in financial industry excesses that triggered the credit crisis two years ago, and to tighten rules on how much capital banks must have to absorb losses.

The new rules aimed at improving the quality and amount of capital should be ready by the end of 2010 and will be phased in in the following two years, the draft said.


Foreign Investors Poured $9 Billion in Indian Stock Market :)

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Foreign investors have poured Rs 43,837 crore (USD 9.05 billion) into the country’s stock markets so far this year, reflecting confidence of foreign funds in the Indian equity markets.

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At the close on Wednesday, overseas investors were gross buyer of shares worth 4,17,121 crore and gross sellers of stocks valued at Rs 3,73,283 crore, resulting in a net flow of Rs 43,837 crore into the stock markets so far this year.

This latest data has been announced by the market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI).

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Significantly, the Bombay Stock Exchange benchmark Sensex has gained nearly 73 per cent so far this year.

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The National Stock Exchange barometer Nifty – composed of 50 shares — has also advanced fairly and for the first time in more than a year it touched 5,000 level on Thursday.

(Read more about that on previous blog).

Global fund houses have made a total net investment of Rs 3,564 crore so far in September, according to the SEBI data.

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After pulling out a huge sum of Rs 52,986 crore (USD 11.9 billion) from the local stock markets, foreign investors are now moving their money towards emerging economies like India.

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However in debt market segment, overseas investors have not turned net investor so far this year.

FIIs were net sellers of debt instruments worth Rs 527 crore (USD 49 million) in 2009 so far according to the latest data received from the market regulatory body,SEBI.

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US Economists feel Positive, says Worst is Behind :)

Worst is behind :)

Among the world’s large economies, UK, which is the seventh largest and Italy, the tenth, remain in recession, like the US.

The UK economy shrunk 0.8% in the second quarter, while Italy’s was down 0.5%.

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Unlike in the UK, however, economists in the US believe the worst may be behind them.

‘‘It’s quite possible, though not certain, that retrospectively, we’ll say that the recession ended in July or August, may be September,’’ Nobel laureate Paul Krugman was quoted as saying.

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There is evidence that his is not undue optimism.

The pace of job losses in the US slowed more than forecast in July and the unemployment rate dropped for the first time in more than a year.

US GDP also shrank by just 0.3% (equivalent to an annualized 1%) in the seconnd-quarter after a 6.4% drop in the previous three months.

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That explains why US Federal Reserve is willing to bet that the nosedive the economy had witnessed in recent months is behind it.

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Over the last two years, the US has witnessed its worst financial crisis in decades, but that could be ending, which is good news for the world since it accounts for a fifth of global GDP.

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France and Germany also announced unexpected returns to the growth path, which means that four of the world’s five largest economies and six of the top 10 are now not in recession.

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Adding to the sense of optimism, the US Federal Reserve left rates unchanged, saying that the world’s largest economy was showing signs of levelling out.

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Among the five largest economies of the world, measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars — which is more of an apples to apples comparison — China and India are already growing at healthy rates, although lower than their own pace for the last few years.

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Japan too has climbed out of recession and so has Germany.

These economies and the US account for 47% of world GDP in PPP terms.

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Among the world’s other large economies, Brazil is also now no longer in recession having grown by 1.5% in the second quarter.

Among the world’s large economies, UK, which is the seventh largest and Italy, the tenth, remain in recession, like the US. The UK economy shrunk 0.8% in the second quarter, while Italy’s was down 0.5%.

Unlike in the UK, however, economists in the US believe the worst may be behind them. ‘‘It’s quite possible, though not certain, that retrospectively, we’ll say that the recession ended in July or August, may be September,’’ Nobel laureate Paul Krugman was quoted as saying.

There is evidence that his is not undue optimism. The pace of job losses in the US slowed more than forecast in July and the unemployment rate dropped for the first time in more than a year. US GDP also shrank by just 0.3% (equivalent to an annualized 1%) in the seconnd-quarter after a 6.4% drop in the previous three months.

That explains why US Federal Reserve is willing to bet that the nosedive the economy had witnessed in recent months is behind it. Over the last two years, the US has witnessed its worst financial crisis in decades, but that could be ending, which is good news for the world since it accounts for a fifth of global GDP.

Some light showed up at the end of the recession tunnel on Wednesday as France and Germany announced unexpected returns to the growth path, which means that four of the world’s five largest economies and six of the top 10 are now not in recession.

Adding to the sense of optimism, the US Federal Reserve left rates unchanged, saying that the world’s largest economy was showing signs of levelling out. Both France and Germany had been predicted by most economists to face a decline of about 0.3% in their GDPs for the second quarter (April-June) of 2009, but they surprised themselves and the rest of the world by announcing that they’ve actually recorded growth of 0.3% each.

Among the five largest economies of the world, measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars — which is more of an apples to apples comparison — China and India are already growing at healthy rates, although lower than their own pace for the last few years. Japan too has climbed out of recession and so has Germany. These economies and the US account for 47% of world GDP in PPP terms.

The Eurozone as a whole is also now projected to have contracted by just 0.1% compared to the 2.5% fall in GDP in the first quarter (January-March). The growth rates reported by Germany and France may seem like nothing to get excited about, but considering that German GDP shrunk by 3.5% in the first quarter and France’s by 1.3%, it is quite a smart turnaround.

Among the world’s other large economies, Brazil is also now no longer in recession having grown by 1.5% in the second quarter.