Posts Tagged ‘CRR’

RBI hikes policy rates by 25 bps, surprises on timing

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) in the post market hours on Friday evening hiked its benchmark policy rates repo and reverse repo by 25 basis points (bps) in order to check the surging pace of price hike and cushion inflationary expectations which have been threatening to move out of central bank’s control.

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The hike while was well anticipated, the timing of the announcement was an absolute surprise. Analysts have been anticipating a mid-cycle hike right from the release of central bank’s annual monetary policy statement in April. However, the euro zone sovereign debt crisis and the recent liquidity crunch have been weighing on the side of keeping status quo on policy stance.

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The expectations of a mid-cycle action increased after the inflation data released in middle of May showed wholesale prices index (WPI) reaching double digit levels. The RBI however remained silent. Again when the empowered group of ministers (EGoM) hiked fuel prices on June 25, analysts expected RBI to act immediately to counter the inflationary impact of partial deregulation of auto fuels and hike cocking fuels. No action however came at that time.

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Now that the scheduled review is just around four weeks away (July 27), most economists were expecting that the RBI will wait for the policy review. However, surprising the markets in a classical way, the central bank increased the rates when no one was anticipating.

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Notwithstanding the surprise though, the policy action is a welcome move as inflationary tendencies have been increasing sharply over last few months. The central bank, according to many observers, is already behind the curve, and may have to pick up the pace of policy tightening going forward if the pace of prices hike in the non-food manufacturing space continues.

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The timing and extent of hike also suggests that the central bank will further raise policy rates in the scheduled review. In fact, by hiking by 25 bps now, the RBI has given itself more flexibility for the forthcoming review where it can now choose among a number of permutations and combinations of policy and reserve rate mix. It may choose to hike everything (repo, reverse repo and CRR) by 25 bps or may leave CRR alone and hike policy rates by 50 bps. A few other combinations are also plausible.

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Justifying the initial delay in policy action and the actual timing of the move, the RBI stated, “This mid-cycle policy action has been warranted by the evolving macroeconomic situation. Even as data for real GDP growth and WPI inflation became available by mid-June 2010, it was considered inadvisable to raise the policy rates as the financial system was dealing with liquidity pressures…Through the month of June, liquidity under LAF operations remained in deficit mode. Consequently, the call rate moved up significantly, resulting in an effective tightening at the short end of the yield curve. The liquidity situation has since begun to ease”.

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Since the RBI expects that liquidity may continue to remain tight for some time, it has also extended the additional liquidity support to scheduled commercial banks under the LAF to the extent of up to 0.5% of their net demand and time liabilities (NDTL) up to July 16, 2010. The measure was first put in place on May 26 after liquidity scenario tightened following the advance tax outgo and huge payments for the 3G spectrum by telecom operators and was earlier set to expire on July 2, 2010.

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While the two moves may seem contradictory, the RBI didn’t leave the matter to be explained by analysts and added in its statement, “It should be noted in this context that the liquidity easing measures have become necessary to manage what is essentially a temporary and unanticipated development. In no way should they be viewed as inconsistent with the monetary policy stance of calibrated exit, which remains focused on containing inflation and anchoring inflationary expectations without hurting growth”.

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Weekly Update 26th – 30th April 2010

Domestic markets started the week on a negative note on the back of the Greek debt issues and Goldman Sachs fraud issues, but managed to close in the positive terrain supported by firm US markets in line with less than expected hike in Policy Rates & Cash Reserve Ratio by RBI to tame the inflation; Policy rates and CRR increased by 25 bps each. The food price index rose 17.65% in the 12 months to April 10, marginally higher than an annual rise of 17.22% in the previous week. Moreover IMF announcement of India`s growth at 8.5% for the calendar 2011 boosted the sentiments.

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Additionally, announcement of government recapitalization of PSU banks stimulated banking sector and banking stocks were among the major gainers of the week. Good corporate numbers, expectation of good monsoon together with buying by foreign institutions kept the momentum intact for the rest of the week. Going forward market participants globally would be closely watching G20 finance chiefs plan to withdraw economic stimulus as the recovery strengthens.

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The IMF this week said that rising government debt is one of the biggest threats to the world economy.

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Forecast of normal monsoon season by Indian Meteorological department may keep the sentiments positive in the coming week but volatility may rise ahead of the expiry. On the global front, the UK’s economy grew at a slower than anticipated pace in the first quarter. In US, sales of new homes surged by 27 percent in March and orders for most durable goods climbed, indicating the U.S. economy is speeding ahead into the second quarter. Greece troubles that kept the markets jittery especially for the payments approaching in the month of May came to an end after it said that it has sought a relief aid from the European Union to save it from a default.

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US stock markets kept the rally intact which held the other world markets and did not let them fall.

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Shanghai remained under pressure as commodities saw some pressure and profit booking at higher levels. Indian stocks are seeing more strength in cash stocks and banking stocks. Nifty has support between 5200-5100 levels and Sensex between 17400-17200 levels.

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This week is full of event risk, especially from US economy side. Gradually, commodity is retreating from the higher levels but it will be too early to say that it is giving a clear indication for the approaching time. But yes, upside is limited.

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Negative expectation of US GDP figure for the first quarter may hammer the prices. If dollar index trades above the level of 82 then it would keep gold to be in sideways territory. Copper saw three weeks nonstop downside and it is expected to see more downside. Range trading in crude oil is indicating the saturation at the higher levels and market needs big news to see further upside..

Weekly Update of The Market (1st – 5th February) Part 1

Hello Friends, here, we bring you the weekly overview of the Indian as well as of the Global economy and along with the latest global business and industry updates.

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Weekly Update of The Market (1st - 5th February) Part 1

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A bout of volatility was witnessed in the domestic market throughout the week due to

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1.  F&O expiry,

2.  unfavorable global cues because of gloomy earnings forecast,

3.  anxiety about China‘s monetary tightening,

4.  the deteriorating finances of countries ranging from Greece to Japan and

5.  India’s central bank‘s decision to raise the CRR to 5.75.

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🙂

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But on later days of the week, US Federal Reserve’s decision to keep interest rates unchanged boosted sentiments of global markets.

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Closer home, investors also heaved a sigh of relief as the central bank kept key interest rates unchanged at the quarterly policy review indicating that it would maintain a balance between price stability and growth and raised its GDP growth projection for the current fiscal to 7.5 %.

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The RBI at its quarterly monetary policy review raised CRR by 75 basis points to suck out excess liquidity from the banking system to the tune of Rs 36000 crore.

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On the flip side, the challenges that RBI foresees for the economy is fiscal consolidation.

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The central bank lifted its wholesale price index inflation forecast for the end of the fiscal year in March 2010 to 8.5% from its earlier forecast of 6.5%.

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RBI also said it expected inflation to moderate starting in July 2010, assuming a normal monsoon and global oil prices holding at current levels.

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Moreover, US Federal Reserve too maintained interest rates at near zero levels and vowed to do so for an extended period of time.

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Additionally, it also signaled its intention of unwinding the massive monetary stimulus that it had undertaken during the peak of the crisis.

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🙂

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Stay Tuned for More on weekly updates.

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Note : For More Latest Industry, Stock Market and Economy News and Updates, please click here

RBI Increases CRR, Kicked off its War against Inflation

RBI Increases CRR, Kicked off its War against Inflation

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The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has kicked off its war against inflation and build-up of inflationary pressures by announcing a surprise increase of 75 basis points in the Cash Reserve Ratio (CRR).

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Cash reserve ratio is the minimum liquid assets, banks have to retain against deposits or park with the central bank in the form of government securities.

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The CRR will be hiked in two stages : 50 basis points from Feb 13 and another 25 basis from Feb 27 – from the present 5 percent, Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Governor D Subbarao told.

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However, in a cautious move not to disrupt the money supply, the RBI left the key policy rates – repo and reverse repo – unchanged.

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“As a result of this increase in the CRR, about Rs.36,000 crore of excess liquidity will be absorbed from the system,” Subbarao added, as he presented the third quarterly update of the central bank’s monetary policy for this fiscal.

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Subbarao said the cut in excess liquidity will help anchor inflationary expectations and that the recovery process of the economy will be supported without compromising on price stability.

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As inflation was steadily growing and the economy was slowly returning to higher growth trajectory, it was expected that the RBI would tighten monetary policy.

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But the 75-bps hike, according to investors, is a “more hawkish” move than many expected.

The market had expected and was prepared for a 50-bps hike.

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Central bank has said the action was necessary as the “rapidly rising” food inflation was putting pressure on other sectors as well.

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India’s inflation jumped to 7.31 percent in December, 2009 from 4.78 percent in November, mainly driven by high food prices.

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The questions cropping up as a result of this move are :

-Will this move by the central bank going to check the inflation?

-Moreover, what implications this step holds for the economic growth?

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Stay Tuned for More.. 🙂

RBI And Its Policies – Part 1

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

However here we bring more on the RBI policies and projections.

RBI policies and projections

RBI policies and projections

 

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) laid the groundwork on Tuesday i.e. on 27th Oct in its monetary policy for a rise in interest rates by tightening credit to the commercial property sector, lifting its inflation forecast and warning of the threat of asset price bubbles.

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The RBI had injected in massive liquidity in the banking system in the past one year or so to help revive the domestic economy in the aftermath of the global financial crisis.

For now, the Reserve Bank has decided to keep the policy repo rate unchanged at 4.75 per cent, the reverse repo rate unchanged at 3.25 per cent and the (Cash Reserve Ratio) CRR of banks unchanged at 5 per cent of their (NDTL).


The following measures constitute the first phase of ‘exit’:

– The Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR), which has earlier been reduced from 25 per cent of NDTL to 24 per cent, is being restored to 25 per cent.

-The limit for export credit refinance facility, which was raised to 50 per cent of eligible outstanding export credit, is being returned to the pre-crisis level of 15 per cent.

The two unconventional refinance facilities:

(i) special refinance facility for scheduled commercial banks; and

(ii) special term repo facility for scheduled commercial banks [for funding to Mutual Funds (MFs), Non-banking Financial Companies (NBFCs), and Housing Finance Companies (HFCs)] are being discontinued with immediate effect.

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Further, the liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in Collateralized Borrowing and Lending Obligations (CBLO) with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) would now be subject to the maintenance of the CRR.

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Stay Tuned for more on this in our coming blogs.

We would cover Monetary Projections of RBI and Economy scenario and indicators at the moment.

NEWS CAPSULES

Hello Friends,

Last week witnessed lots of action with results of some major companies coupled with the RBI’s monetary policy.

Moreover, Week gone by, Indian markets turned distinctly weak as a sluggish global trend continued to cast a shadow on markets.

NEWS CAPSULES

NEWS CAPSULES

Having said that here we bring you latest updates from the Indian market and Industry.

NEWS CAPSULES

1.

A hawkish Reserve Bank of India (RBI), while staying away from hiking key rates like repo or reverse repo, hiked the statutory liquidity ratio(SLR) to 25% from 24%.

The cash reserve ratio (CRR), the minimum amount banks need to park with the RBI, was also left unchanged.

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Sun TV Network Ltd (Sun TV), owned by Kalanithi Maran, is looking at foreign partners to produce non-fiction contents.
The company joined hands with Dutch firm Endemol to launch a television game show.

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Tata Steel, the sixth-largest steel maker in the world, has posted a 49.49 per cent drop in net profit at Rs 902.94 crore in the second quarter, following a sharp fall in steel and ferro alloys’ prices.

Total income fell 16.46 per cent to Rs 5,692.11 crore.

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The Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group-controlled Reliance Natural Resources (RNRL) has posted a 5 per cent rise in net profit at Rs 21 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2009, against Rs 20 crore for the corresponding previous quarter.

During the quarter under review, RNRL’s total income decreased to Rs 66 crore from Rs 81 crore for the same quarter ended previous year.

The company posted an earning of Rs 0.13 per share for the quarter.

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Wipro Limited, backed by increases in price realisation, utilisation and fixed price contracts at its flagship IT services business, posted a 19 per cent increase in its net profit to Rs 1,162 crore for the second quarter ended September 30, 2009 as compared to the corresponding quarter of the previous financial year.

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United Spirits, India’s largest spirits firm, has posted a 25 per cent decline in net profit to Rs 69.6 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2009 where as the same was at Rs 94 crore for the quarter ended September 30, 2008.

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Jet Airways, India’s largest private airline, reported net losses of Rs 406.69 crore for the second quarter ended September 20, down nearly 6 per cent from the same quarter last year.

The loss was mainly because of lower yield per seat following Jet’s decision to shift over half of its capacity to its low-cost service.

The shift of capacity to low-cost arm Jet Konnect was executed in May this year.

Jet Konnect fares are at least 25 per cent cheaper than full-service fares and a high load factor of 77 per cent did not offset the lower yield per passenger from cheaper fares.

🙂

However, For More latest Industry, Gyan, Stock Market and Economy News Updates, Click here

Factors that Move the Interest Rates – Part 2 (MONETARY POLICY)

Monetary Policy

In previous Blog we have discussed about the major factors responsible for the change in interest rates and price of bonds indirectly.

All those three factors like Inflation, Currency and Liquidity have been touched upon in last blog.

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Now time to look into another major factor which causes  movement in the interest rate. The factor i am talking about is Monetary Policy. 🙂

Monetary Policy: The RBI controls liquidity largely through monetary policy instruments –

(i) CRR & SLR – CRR (Cash Reserve Ratio) refers to a portion of deposits (as cash) which banks have to maintain with the RBI.

Banks are also required to invest a portion of their deposits in government securities as a part of their SLR (Statutory Liquidity Ratio) requirements.

If either of these is increased, liquidity tightens and so interest rates harden (increase).:(

Recently, RBI has reduced both these rates to infuse liquidity in the system – CRR is 5% (down 250 bps from March ’08) and SLR is 24% (down 100 bps).

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(ii) Reverse repo rate – it is the overnight interest rate that a bank earns for lending money to the RBI in exchange for G-Secs.

A hike in reverse repo rate increases interest rates. Currently, reverse repo rate stands at 3.25%.

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(iii) Repo rate – it is the discount rate at which a central bank repurchases government securities from the commercial banks.

To temporarily expand the money supply, the central bank decreases repo rates (so that banks can swap their holdings of government securities for cash).

To contract the money supply, it increases the repo rates. The current repo rate is 4.75%.

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(iv) OMO and MSS – OMOs (Open Market Operations) are outright transactions in government securities.

When the RBI buys G-Secs, it is injecting money into the system, hence, increasing liquidity, which softens (reduces) interest rates.

When the RBI sells G-Secs, it sucks out excess money from the system i.e. reduces liquidity in the system which hardens interest rates.

MSS (Market Stabilisation Scheme) is the issuance of treasury bills and dated securities by way of auction by the RBI.

This affects interest rates in the same manner as OMOs.

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Having collected updates on where the above parameters stand, one can have a better understanding of why interest rates are at their current levels, as well as which direction they are expected to move in.

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If most of them indicate that a rise in interest rates is expected, bond prices are likely to fall in the future.

On the contrary, an expectation of a fall in interest rates means bond prices will rise.

A word of caution here though – timing interest rate changes is difficult. This is because there is a low likelihood of being able to precisely predict the movement in the factors discussed above.

So in order to minimize interest rate risk, one should ensure that the bond portfolio is diversified across various maturities.

🙂

4 Monetary Policy: The RBI controls liquidity largely through monetary policy instruments –

(i) CRR & SLR – CRR (Cash Reserve Ratio) refers to a portion of deposits (as cash) which banks have to maintain with the RBI. Banks are also required to invest a portion of their deposits in government securities as a part of their SLR (Statutory Liquidity Ratio) requirements. If either of these is increased, liquidity tightens and so interest rates harden (increase). Recently, RBI has reduced both these rates to infuse liquidity in the system – CRR is 5% (down 250 bps from March ’08) and SLR is 24% (down 100 bps).

(ii) Reverse repo rate – it is the overnight interest rate that a bank earns for lending money to the RBI in exchange for G-Secs. A hike in reverse repo rate increases interest rates. Currently, reverse repo rate stands at 3.25%.

(iii) Repo rate – it is the discount rate at which a central bank repurchases government securities from the commercial banks. To temporarily expand the money supply, the central bank decreases repo rates (so that banks can swap their holdings of government securities for cash).

To contract the money supply, it increases the repo rates. The current repo rate is 4.75%.

(iv) OMO and MSS – OMOs (Open Market Operations) are outright transactions in government securities. When the RBI buys G-Secs, it is injecting money into the system, hence, increasing liquidity, which softens (reduces) interest rates. When the RBI sells G-Secs, it sucks out excess money from the system i.e. reduces liquidity in the system which hardens interest rates. MSS (Market Stabilisation Scheme) is the issuance of treasury bills and dated securities by way of auction by the RBI. This affects interest rates in the same manner as OMOs.

Having collected updates on where the above parameters stand, one can have a better understanding of why interest rates are at their current levels, as well as which direction they are expected to move in. If most of them indicate that a rise in interest rates is expected, bond prices are likely to fall in the future. On the contrary, an expectation of a fall in interest rates means bond prices will rise. A word of caution here though – timing interest rate changes is difficult. This is because there is a low likelihood of being able to precisely predict the movement in the factors discussed above. So in order to minimize interest rate risk, one should ensure that the bond portfolio is diversified across various maturities.