Posts Tagged ‘commercial banks’

Indian Private Equity Industry to Hit By US Banks Curbs : Experts

Indian Private Equity Industry to Hit By US Banks Curbs

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In case, US President Barack Obama‘s proposal to curb the role of commercial banks in hedge and PE funds is implemented, then fund-raising could indeed become a very tough task for Indian private equity players.

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But at the same time, the move could help Indian funds take part in more deals, market players insist.

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Obama has proposed to bar commercial banks from owning, advising and investing their own capital in PE and hedge funds.

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Though most investors in Indian PE funds are university funds, endowment funds, pension funds, insurance funds and institutional investors,Β  the industry expects the move to impact fund-raising in the long term and in big way, as banks will be barred from taking part in these funds.

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A large number of venture capital and PE funds of US-based commercial banks had reduced their exposure to India during the economic slowdown.

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Though few big ones like Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch etc; stayed back in the market.

Indian PE players hope to get more deals if these players vacate the market.

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Market experts do not see any significant impact in the coming few months, but cannot deny that a slowdown in USA market will surely impact the Indian private equity industry.

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They feel that any curbs on banks would make fund-raising a very difficult task since banks were the biggest contributors of funds.

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Industry players say the focus will shift from funds of banks to fund of funds, pension funds, and university and endowment funds.

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“It will be difficult to put a number as these transactions are structured in a complex manner.

But I believe a significant proportion of investments in India-based PE funds come from balance sheets of these banks.

These firms will be affected and will have to look for new sources of money,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, equity head at SMC Capitals.

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Banks May Not Up Interest Rates For Next Six Months

Banks May Not Up Interest Rates For Next Six Months

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New Year has brought a good news for the Corporate India.

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SBI Bank chairman has indicated that there will be no increase in interest rates for next six months despite inflationary pressure.

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As inflation is rising, there was speculation going around that RBI, (in its review of monetary policy) might take measures to tighten the money supply which would have led to the hardening of interest rates.

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As the global economy is still in the grip of recession, industry players feel that any hike in interest rates will affect the economic recovery in India.

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Banks authorities and market analysts feel that there was surplus liquidity in the system and credit offtake was slowly picking up.

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This situation of liquidity surplus will force banks not to increase interest rates, in current situation.

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Because of this surplus liquidity, banks have cut deposits rates.

But they are not cutting the lending rates due to slow credit offtake, despite the speculation that RBI can increase key rates (repo or reverse repo) to contain inflation.

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In the eight months of the current financial year till December 4, while the deposits with the commercial banks rose by 3,69,535 crore, credit off take was only Rs 1,44,151 crore.

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This forced the banks to park around Rs 100,000 crore with the RBI at reverse repo rate of 3.25%.

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When the interest rate condition was benign, Banks had cut their lending rates, particularly home loan rate.

This had helped reviving real estate market. The buyers started coming back and cement and steel sectors also started improving.

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The recession did not hit India the way it had affected European countries last year.

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There was only a slowdown in the growth rate which came down to 7% from 9%.

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Market experts believe that withdrawal of stimulus package by the government should not be done in the prevailing situation, but should be phased out in staggered manner.

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IRDA Allows Banks to Sell Insurance Products of Multiple Companies

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The Insurance Regulatory & Development Authority (IRDA) is likely to permit banks to sell insurance products of more than one company.

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The move will allow banks to retail insurance products and not just be distributor for one insurer.

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A panel, set up by the IRDA to look into bancassurance, is finalizing its report, an IRDA official said.

From 2002, IRDA had allowed bancassurance.

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A bank was allowed to act as an agent for only one life and one general insurer according to the norms.

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Bancassurance is a delivery channel in which an insurance company uses a bank”s sales channel to sell its products.

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At present, bancassurance garners more than a quarter of the entire premium collected by the insurance industry.

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Combining scheduled commercial banks, co-operative banks and regional rural development banks, India has close to 1,70,000 bank branches.

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IRDA has been concerned about tie-ups between banks and insurance companies and is considering a regulatory framework for an open architecture for such arrangements

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RBI’s Monetary Policy – Analyst View

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

Just an extension of our previous blog β€œRBI’s Monetary Policy Stance – Part 3”.

 

 

Analyst View RBI policy

RBI Monetary Policies and Projections Part 4

 


In this Blog we would read the Analyst views with respect to the monetary point of view.

Analysis from the Analyst from monetary point of view:

Though there is a hike in SLR to 25 % but we think it will not have much more impact because the total investment book of commercial banks is already at 30.4% of total NDTL.

Although key rates of CRR, reverse repo and repo rates have been left unchanged, special repo facilities have been withdrawn.

Real estate loans provisioning are set to become more expensive.

NPA norms for banks have been tightened while liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in CBLO with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) will be subject to maintenance of CRR.

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The RBI is thus attempting to withdraw liquidity from areas where excess liquidity had reached a point it was more than comfortable with, while also targeting better quality management of credit.

Another point is that in the policy stance, RBI has given first priority to keep a vigil on trends in inflation and to be prepared to respond swiftly and effectively through policy adjustments to stabilize inflation expectations.

Second, it will monitor the liquidity situation closely and manage it actively to ensure that credit demands of productive sectors are adequately met while also securing price stability and financial stability.

Lastly, RBI will maintain a monetary and interest rate regime consistent with price stability and financial stability, and supportive of the growth process.

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In conclusion, it bears emphasis that the Reserve Bank is mindful of its fundamental commitment to price stability.

It will continue to monitor the price situation in its entirety and will take measures as warranted by the evolving macroeconomic conditions swiftly and effectively.

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To conclude all the factors it seems that with the withdrawal of special liquidity measures together with an imposition of CRR in borrowing in CBLO market, RBI has taken a first to step towards controlling liquidity.

 

With prioritizing inflation it is expected that the next step of RBI could hike in CRR as it has also reduced the indicative growth of Broad money to 17% from 18%.

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RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

Hello Friends,

Just an extension of our previous blog ”RBI And Its Policies – Part 1β€³.

RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy

In this Blog we would touch upon the aspects as that of Monetary projection from RBI, assessment of economy scenario at present and relevance of RBI policy on economy.

Monetary projection:

For policy purposes, money supply (M3) growth for 2009-10 is placed at 17.0 per cent, down from 18.0 per cent projected in the Annual Policy Statement.

Consistent with this, aggregate deposits of scheduled commercial banks are projected to grow by 18.0 per cent.

The growth in adjusted nonfood credit, including investment in bonds/debentures/shares of public sector undertakings and private corporate sector and Commercial Papers (CPs), has been revised downwards at 18.0 per cent as in the Annual Policy Statement.

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Economy:

Since the last review in July 2009, there has been a discernable improvement in the global economy.

The recovery is underpinned by output expansion in emerging market economies, particularly in Asia.

World output has improved in the second quarter, manufacturing activity has picked up, trade is recovering, financial market conditions are improving, and risk appetite is returning.

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A sharp recovery in equity markets has enabled banks to raise capital to repair their balance sheets.

If we talk about the home country then there are definitive indications of the economy attaining the ‘escape velocity‘ and reverting to the growth track.

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The performance of the industrial sector has improved markedly in recent months.

Domestic and external financing conditions are on the upturn.

Capital inflows have revived.

Moreover activity in the primary capital market has picked up and funding from non-bank domestic sources has eased.

Liquidity conditions have remained easy and interest rates have softened in the money and credit markets.

Growth projection for GDP for 2009-10 on current assessment is placed at 6.0% with an upward bias, the same as the previous policy review.

But some darker parts also persist.

There are clear signs of rising inflation stemming largely from the supply side, particularly from food prices.

Private consumption demand is yet to pick up.

Agricultural production is expected to decline.

Services sector growth remains below trend.

Bank credit growth continues to be sluggish.

The central bank has warned of possible asset price bubbles, raised banks’ provisioning requirements for commercial real estate loans and lifted inflation forecast.

WPI inflation for end-March 2010 is projected at 6.5 per cent with an upward bias.

This is once again higher than the projection of 5.0 per cent made in the Annual Policy Statement in July 2009.

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Stay Tuned for more on the topic.

We would look into Monetary Policy stance, more facts about economic indicators and Analysis from the Analyst from monetary point of view.

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RBI And Its Policies – Part 1

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

However here we bring more on the RBI policies and projections.

RBI policies and projections

RBI policies and projections

 

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) laid the groundwork on Tuesday i.e. on 27th Oct in its monetary policy for a rise in interest rates by tightening credit to the commercial property sector, lifting its inflation forecast and warning of the threat of asset price bubbles.

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The RBI had injected in massive liquidity in the banking system in the past one year or so to help revive the domestic economy in the aftermath of the global financial crisis.

For now, the Reserve Bank has decided to keep the policy repo rate unchanged at 4.75 per cent, the reverse repo rate unchanged at 3.25 per cent and the (Cash Reserve Ratio) CRR of banks unchanged at 5 per cent of their (NDTL).


The following measures constitute the first phase of ‘exit’:

– The Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR), which has earlier been reduced from 25 per cent of NDTL to 24 per cent, is being restored to 25 per cent.

-The limit for export credit refinance facility, which was raised to 50 per cent of eligible outstanding export credit, is being returned to the pre-crisis level of 15 per cent.

The two unconventional refinance facilities:

(i) special refinance facility for scheduled commercial banks; and

(ii) special term repo facility for scheduled commercial banks [for funding to Mutual Funds (MFs), Non-banking Financial Companies (NBFCs), and Housing Finance Companies (HFCs)] are being discontinued with immediate effect.

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Further, the liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in Collateralized Borrowing and Lending Obligations (CBLO) with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) would now be subject to the maintenance of the CRR.

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Stay Tuned for more on this in our coming blogs.

We would cover Monetary Projections of RBI and Economy scenario and indicators at the moment.

Banks Pushes for Short Term Credit :)

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Banks have started pushing short-term credit to shore-up loan books before the end of the lean season.

Bank’s move is attributed to abundant liquidity.

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According to highly placed bank officials, credit off take continue to be lacklustre.

Credit growth this year was hardly a third of the level for the corresponding period of the previous year.

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This financial year, non-food credit was only Rs 29,133 crore as against Rs 98,840 crore during the corresponding year-ago period.

This translated into an incremental credit-deposit ratio of just 12 per cent as against 53 per cent for the same period of the last financial year.

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Meanwhile, the majority of corporate loan off-take (especially by large corporates) was in the form of short-term loans.

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Most of the loans are for short durations like of the 30 days.

These loans are refinanced with commercial paper (CP) issues.

Further, the loans were priced low, as between 7 and 8 per cent.

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Such short-terms advances were then repaid when corporate made their CP placements.

Last week alone, public sector corporates, including SAIL, had raised at least Rs 2,000 crore through six-month CP issues priced as low as 5 per cent.

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Bankers feel short-term credit push would help them beef-up loan books for the second quarter of the financial year.

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