Posts Tagged ‘capital’

Retail Investors Turn Cautious Towards IPOs

Retail Investors Turn Cautious Towards IPOs

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Aggressive IPO pricing and poor post-listing performances have made retail investors extremely cautious this year.

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Of the Rs 18,407 crore collected through IPOs, the retail investor portion was subscribed 1.86 times on an average, according to a research report by SMC Capital.

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Qualified institutional buyers‘ portion was subscribed by 11.42 times and high net worth individuals’ portion by 8.49 times.

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IPOs this year were subscribed 7.64 times.

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Of the 19 IPOs, the retail portions of five issues were not even fully subscribed, while five just about managed to get subscribed.

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Many retail Investors have decided against putting money into recent IPOs after looking at the post-listing performances of stocks that were listed earlier.

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Only shares of six companies are trading above their issue prices – these include Mahindra Holidays, Oil India and Cox and Kings (India).

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A lot of investors had saved up, especially for the NHPC IPO.  But when it listed poorly these investor must have suffered hugely.

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As per the market experts , a lot of the IPOs that came out this year have been highly priced, which has made the already skeptical retail investor stay away from the primary market.

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Bunch of retail investors are looking at “short-term gains”, so they now prefer to invest their money in the secondary markets rather than in IPOs, market experts feel.

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If one goes by the DRHPs filed with SEBI, there are approximately Rs 29,000 crore worth of IPOs in the pipeline, said Mr Jagannadham Thunuguntla, Equity Head at SMC Capital.

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🙂

India Inc Cautions Govt. for any Regulation on CEO’s Pay !

Corporate India cautioned the government that any regulation of CEOs' pay might lead to escape of talent and capital from the country

Corporate India cautioned the government that any regulation of CEOs' pay might lead to escape of talent and capital from the country

Corporate India cautioned the government that any regulation of CEOs’ pay might lead to escape of talent and capital from the country and that salaries are best decided by the industry.

However, Corporate Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid stated that the CEOs’ compensation should be regulated.

On the other hand, heads of apex industry chambers said that they would like the issue to be complete by and within India Inc.

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Moreover, the Confederation of Indian Industry is working on a governance code for its members to deal with remuneration of executives at board level and a level below.

Further, Khurshid’s remark activated a debate whether pay packets of CEO’s, some of whom are paid as much as Rs two crore a month, should be regulated.

On the other hand, Singhania said with government regulations already in place, any further regulation is in the first place unnecessary whereas as per the present regulation, compensation of all directors cannot exceed 11% of the total profits of a company.

Additionally, the compensation of all directors, including the executive chairman and whole time directors cannot exceed 10% of the company profit.

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Thanks for the advice. But, no thanks..seems to be the polite message emanating from India Inc to the government drive to extend its new found penchant for austerity into corporate boardrooms.

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Corporate affairs minister Salman Khurshid at the weekend said the government could not shut its eyes on CEO salaries and urged corporate bosses to avoid “excessive remuneration” .

According to figures compiled by ET, top 30 Indian executives together pocketed around Rs 500 crore ($100 million) in compensation last year, which is less than what each of their top five global counterparts earned.

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G-5, G-8..Not Anymore..Its G-20 Now !!

G20-world-economy

For the world, apparently, eight is no longer enough.

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The G-8 group of powerhouse economies, which expanded from the original G-5 one by one over three decades, stepped off center stage Friday with the ascension of the G-20 into the role of overseeing the global economy.

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The Group of 20 will take on the role of caretakers of the global economy.

The shift toward multilateral decision-making is sure to please some emerging economies — China and India in particular — and irritate those Americans who believe the United States shouldn’t be handing off its power to international institutions.

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Heading into the second day of a summit aimed at ensuring the world economy emerges from its worst recession in generations with better safeguards against another crisis, the G20 also vowed to keep emergency economic support in place until a recovery is secured, according to the draft obtained by Reuters.

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The document said G20 countries had a “responsibility to the community of nations to assure the overall health of the global economy” and pledged to try to secure next year a deal in long-running world trade talks.

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Larger G-20 would take over — a council that, by simple virtue of a membership that unites more than 80 percent of the global economy, and would be a force to be reckoned with.

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The group, which also accounts for 90 per cent of the world’s economic output, also agreed to rein in financial industry excesses that triggered the credit crisis two years ago, and to tighten rules on how much capital banks must have to absorb losses.

The new rules aimed at improving the quality and amount of capital should be ready by the end of 2010 and will be phased in in the following two years, the draft said.


Venture capitalists have little fancy for Indian start-ups

Venture capitalists have little fancy for Indian start-ups

Dreamy-eyed Indian entrepreneurs, hoping to talk their way into getting venture capital for their start-ups might as well look elsewhere for funding.

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It doesn’t happen in India, not often anyway, investors and experts in the industry, maintain.

Venture capitalists in India only prefer growth-stage companies — firms already up and running that need money for expansion.

Most start-up entrepreneurs, as a result, dive into their own pockets or banks, or draw funds from family and friends.


Seed capital for a new business has not come of age in India, they added.

The concept of seed capital does not exist in India, there are a few funds which have come up of late, but it is minuscule compared to the need and potential.

And the problem has also compounded by the current economic scenario, where financial institutions are more concerned with keeping their capital safe than risk their funds with a new venture.

Venture capital firms invested $740 million India in 2008 compared to $876 million in the previous year.

‘The number of deals were also down to 125 in 2008 from 144 in 2007.

Jagannadham Thunuguntla, equity head at SMC Capitals, has an explanation.

‘The confidence among foreign funds, be it venture capital or private equity, hasn’t been restored after what happened back home.’

According to him, these funds will start returning to the equities markets first, and later look at other avenues.

Among start-ups, too, there is intense competition to get venture capital funding.

And more often, there is one set of firms that comes up tops — IT-based businesses or companies that use the web to reach out to customers, said veteran venture capitalists.

A lot of venture capital firms look favourably at IT start-ups because once the concept takes off it is easier for such businesses to scale up.

Also venture capitalists generally have a Silicon Valley background and have a greater understanding of such types of business models.

Past record also matters — a larger number of IT firms have given attractive returns.

‘There is a reasonably long list of IT firms — MindTree, Spectramind, Mphasis, Daksh, Naukri.com — which have delivered good exits for venture capitalists.

Perhaps, that’s the reason why people like Manish Malhotra – who quit his position with a top bank to start a hospitality agency – are still floundering with their business.

‘Venture capital is difficult to get. I come from the banking industry and know people. But even then it hasn’t been easy at all to convince them that my plans will work,’ Malhotra said.

Dreamy-eyed Indian entrepreneurs, hoping to talk their way into getting venture capital for their start-ups might as well look elsewhere for funding.