Archive for the ‘Online back office support’ Category

Moneywise…Be Wise ;)

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If you find yourself asking the question –

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Why should I Save ?

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Why should I Invest ?

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Where do I Invest ?

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Who would Guide me to take informed decision on my Investments ?

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…then look no further !

Why SMC?

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SMC Group, a leading Financial services provider in India, a vertically integrated investment solutions company, with a pan-india presence is there to guide you and provide complete investment solutions to you.

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SMC Group, having rich experience of more then two decades in financial markets, is one of the largest & most reputed investment solutions company that provides a wide range of services to its client base of more than 5, 50,000 clients with presence in more then 1500 cities.

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SMC Online, an unit of SMC Group, is one stop financial investment portal for investor’s all financial needs.

Investors can trade online in Equities, FNO, Currency Futures, Commodities, apply online for IPOs, and invest online in Mutual Funds.

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SMC is :

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a) 4th Largest broking house of India in terms of trading terminals (Source: Dun and Bradsheet, 2008)

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b) 5th largest distributor of Initial Public Offering (IPOs) in retail (Source: Prime Data Ranking)

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c) Awarded ‘Fastest Growing Retail Distribution Network in Financial Services’ (Source: Business Sphere, 2008)

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d) Recipient of ‘Major Volume Driver Award’ from BSE for last three years consecutively.

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e) Nominated among the top three in the CNBC Optimix Financial Services Award 2008 under National Level Retail Category.

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f) One of the largest Proprietary Arbitrage Desk doing risk free arbitrage in equities & commodities.

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g) Commanding turnover of more then 3% in equity market, 4% in commodity market and 10% in DGCX.

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h) Transparent and professional management.

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j) Relentless focus on investor care.

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k) World class in-house research facilities providing research support to investors.

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l) All financial products and services under one roof.

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🙂

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Next Blog we would try to read more about the other SMC’s investment products and services.

Stay Tuned for more on this 🙂

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To know more about the SMC Products and Services, click here.

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India May Lead the Second Wave of IT Adoption :)

India-lead-IT-adoption-IBM

As companies kept up investments in spite of the downturn and seemed more advanced than their counterpart globally it is said that India may lead the second wave of IT adoption.

IBM Corp. has come up with the concerned statement.

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According to the IBM survey, 40% of Indian companies stated that they wanted to be first to take up a new technology, while 11% said they would wait till technology was widely available.

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Moreover, companies have cut back less and have really continued their investments in India which is balanced to lead the second wave of IT adoption whereas small-and-medium businesses (SMBs) are the engines motivating the economic development.

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On the other hand, recession forced 37% companies worldwide to decrease their IT budgets as compared to 15% in India.

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Further, the IBM recognized India as one of its main growth markets and will continue to invest here along with Brazil, China and Russia.

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Moreover, IBM plans to cash in on the business coming from SMBs representing more than 90% of all businesses employing over 90% of the world’s workforce in order to produce more patents than large firms.

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Note : For More latest Industry,Stock Market and Economy News Updates, Click Here

Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL)’s Global Reach

Bharat-Sanchar-Nigam-Ltd-bsnl-deepika

When it comes to making money out of its Indian operations, Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) might be in trouble, but that”s not preventing the company from dreaming big on its global foray. However, the national telecom operator is ready to step out of India with a Rs 37,000 crore war chest the company is looking aggressively to make some foreign acquisitions.

In addition, BSNL has already bid for Tigo in Sri Lanka and the next frontier is Africa while the company is open to acquisition of companies as well as new licenses and is close to an acquisition in Kenya.

On the other hand, BSNL has also been approached to buy stake in Zain telecom but even as the government-owned firm looks at buying companies abroad, it is reported to be in talks for selling stake to a foreign partner. However, it is also looking to tie up with international players like NTT Do Co Mo and British Telecom for enterprise services.

To set 25 pct public equity float is tough task for India

equity

India faces an uphill task to reimpose a rule requiring listed companies to have at least a 25 percent public float, with resistance seen from controlling shareholders in private sector firms.

The finance ministry’s effort to bring in a uniform public float minimum comes after a similar push by the capital markets regulator was waylaid by the collapse in markets last year.

Market players say reimposing a minimum float is a good idea but would work only if it were rolled out gradually in order to prevent flooding the market with shares.

A total of 174 firms would need to offload stakes worth roughly 1.61 trillion rupees ($33 billion) if the minimum float rule was imposed, a study by deal tracking firm SMC Capitals showed. Of that, 28 state-run firms, primarily in energy, steel and banks, account for 83 percent.

By comparison, Indian firms have raised $10 billion in share sales so far this year, surpassing the $7.2 billion raised in all of 2008, according to Thomson Reuters data.

PROPOSAL TO HELP PLUG SHORTFALL

India, facing its highest fiscal deficit in 16 years, can use the sale of stakes in government companies to meet the shortfall. A minimum float rule would mean the sale of larger stakes in state firms than might otherwise be considered.

The mandatory share of huge blocks of stock could also be a boon to investment banks managing the sales.

Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee noted in his July 6 budget speech that the average public float in Indian firms was less than 15 percent.

“Deep, non-manipulable markets require larger and diversified public shareholdings. This requirement should be uniformly applied to the private sector as well as public sector companies,” he said.

Recent media reports have said the finance minister has approved a minimum public float plan in phases from 2010/11.

There will be pulls and pressures especially from some private sector firms but this time the authorities are banking on pulling it off given the government finances,” said Arun Kejriwal, director at research firm KRIS.

However, several market insiders were sceptical of the plan’s success, given the huge amount of stock the market would need to absorb, as well as the reluctance of controlling shareholders to trim their stakes.

“It is just impractical from an execution point of view. India just does not have the capacity,” said a top executive at a foreign investment bank. He did not want to be named given the sensitivity of the matter.

The Securities and Exchange Board of India tried implementing the 25 percent rule in phases from 2006 on firms with a market value of under 10 billion rupees ($204 million).

India May Trigger $39 Billion of Share Sales With Ownership Cap :)

India Shines

India may trigger as much as 1.9 trillion rupees ($39 billion) in stock sales, equivalent to five years of equity offerings, with a proposal to limit stakes of controlling shareholders.

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Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s government is considering a plan that would require at least 25 percent of a company’s stock to be traded.

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The rule would prompt equity sales in 560 of Mumbai’s 3,335 most-active stocks, such as NMDC Ltd. and Steel Authority of India Ltd., according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

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The changes may encourage foreign investment by bringing Indian regulations in line with the U.S., U.K. and Hong Kong.

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The 25 percent minimum would be good for the long-term Indian market. There are many very attractive companies with small floats that investors would like to be able to invest in.

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The rule change would require the government, whose constitution embraces socialism, to reduce dominant stakes in key industries such as steel making, oil and electricity supply.

The top 10 companies that would have to sell stock are state- run, accounting for about 80 percent of the total by value.

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Sensex Surges :

The Bombay Stock Exchange’s Sensitive Index, or Sensex, has climbed 61 percent this year, the eighth-best performer among 89 measures tracked by Bloomberg.

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Growth in Asia’s third-largest economy may accelerate to 7.75 percent after the government initiated stimulus plans to bolster banks’ capital and spur consumer spending, according to the finance ministry.

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International funds have bought 357.5 billion rupees of Indian stocks this year through Aug. 11, compared with record net sales of 530 billion rupees for all of 2008, according to data on the Securities and Exchange Board of India Web site.

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The government plans to boost funding for a rural jobs program by selling shares in some state-run companies.

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No Minimum :

Rules allow companies with a free-float worth at least 1 billion rupees to have as little as 10 percent traded, while there is no minimum for state-run enterprises, the ministry’s Web site says.

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The Sensex has returned 192 percent over the past five years, second in Asia only to Indonesia.

Since 2005, companies have raised 1.89 trillion rupees in share sales, including 116 billion rupees in January last year by Mumbai-based Reliance Power Ltd. that marked the country’s biggest initial public offering.

New Delhi-based DLF Ltd., India’s largest real estate developer, sold 92 billion rupees of stock in June 2007.

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Government Control :

India’s government plans to sell 8.38 percent of NMDC, the nation’s largest iron-ore producer.

The stake would fetch 120 billion rupees at current prices.

The government holds 98.4 percent in Hyderabad-based NMDC, and 85.8 percent of New Delhi-based Steel Authority of India, the nation’s second-biggest producer, according to Bloomberg data.

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“The sheer magnitude of offloading involved may result in an overhang on the secondary capital markets,” Jagannadham Thunuguntla, the head of equities at SMC Capitals Ltd. in New Delhi, said in an interview.

“The capital market may find it difficult to absorb such heavy equity” he added.

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The Securities and Exchange Board of India advocates “a phased approach, as companies may need time” to sell shares, N. Hariharan, a Mumbai-based spokesman for the market regulator, said in an e-mail Aug. 7.

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‘Phased Manner’

The proposal “should be positive for markets if introduced in a phased manner,”

🙂

Such a change is a welcome one.

Ensuring a reasonable minimum float would help avoid share price manipulation, scams, abuse by majority shareholders, etc. This would constitute a positive structural change.

🙂

India may trigger as much as 1.9 trillion rupees ($39 billion) in stock sales, equivalent to five years of equity offerings, with a proposal to limit stakes of controlling shareholders.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s government is considering a plan that would require at least 25 percent of a company’s stock to be traded. The rule would prompt equity sales in 560 of Mumbai’s 3,335 most-active stocks, such as NMDC Ltd. and Steel Authority of India Ltd., according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The changes may encourage foreign investment by bringing Indian regulations in line with the U.S., U.K. and Hong Kong, said Anshul Krishan, the Mumbai-based head of Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s India financing group. The sales, equal to about 4 percent of India’s $1 trillion stock market, probably won’t affect prices if they’re staggered over time, said Purav Jhaveri, senior investment strategist at Franklin Global Advisers.

“The 25 percent minimum would be good for the long-term Indian market,” Seth Freeman, chief executive officer of EM Capital Management LLC in San Francisco, which advises investors on emerging markets and runs the EM Capital India Gateway Fund, said in an e-mail response to questions. “There are many very attractive companies with small floats that investors would like to be able to invest in.”

The rule change would require the government, whose constitution embraces socialism, to reduce dominant stakes in key industries such as steelmaking, oil and electricity supply. The top 10 companies that would have to sell stock are state- run, accounting for about 80 percent of the total by value.

Sensex Surges

The Bombay Stock Exchange’s Sensitive Index, or Sensex, has climbed 61 percent this year, the eighth-best performer among 89 measures tracked by Bloomberg. Growth in Asia’s third-largest economy may accelerate to 7.75 percent after the government initiated stimulus plans to bolster banks’ capital and spur consumer spending, according to the finance ministry.

International funds have bought 357.5 billion rupees of Indian stocks this year through Aug. 11, compared with record net sales of 530 billion rupees for all of 2008, according to data on the Securities and Exchange Board of India Web site.

Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee said in his July 6 budget speech that a rule requiring a public float of at least 25 percent for listed companies should be enforced uniformly, even for state-run enterprises that had been exempted. The government plans to boost funding for a rural jobs program by selling shares in some state-run companies.

No Minimum

Rules allow companies with a free-float worth at least 1 billion rupees to have as little as 10 percent traded, while there is no minimum for state-run enterprises, the ministry’s Web site says.

“The average public float in Indian listed companies is less than 15 percent,” Mukherjee said. “Deep, non-manipulable markets require larger and diversified public shareholdings.”

The Sensex has returned 192 percent over the past five years, second in Asia only to Indonesia. Since 2005, companies have raised 1.89 trillion rupees in share sales, including 116 billion rupees in January last year by Mumbai-based Reliance Power Ltd. that marked the country’s biggest initial public offering. New Delhi-based DLF Ltd., India’s largest real estate developer, sold 92 billion rupees of stock in June 2007.

Government Control

India’s government plans to sell 8.38 percent of NMDC, the nation’s largest iron-ore producer, Steel Secretary Pramod Rastogi said Aug. 5. The stake would fetch 120 billion rupees at current prices, he said. The government holds 98.4 percent in Hyderabad-based NMDC, and 85.8 percent of New Delhi-based Steel Authority of India, the nation’s second-biggest producer, according to Bloomberg data.

“The sheer magnitude of offloading involved may result in an overhang on the secondary capital markets,” Jagannadham Thunuguntla, the head of equities at SMC Capitals Ltd. in New Delhi, said in an interview. “The capital market may find it difficult to absorb such heavy equity.”

GMR Infrastructure Ltd., based in Bangalore, scrapped a $500 million international sale on June 30 as at least 40 companies announced plans to sell more than 350 billion rupees of shares, mostly to foreign institutional investors.

The Securities and Exchange Board of India advocates “a phased approach, as companies may need time” to sell shares, N. Hariharan, a Mumbai-based spokesman for the market regulator, said in an e-mail Aug. 7.

‘Phased Manner’

The proposal “should be positive for markets if introduced in a phased manner,” Franklin’s Jhaveri said in an e-mail response to questions. Franklin Templeton Investments in San Mateo, California manages $482.4 billion worldwide, including more than $3 billion in Indian stocks.

The Finance Ministry sought public comment on the plan on its Web site July 9. Singh’s administration plans to take up the issue after completing 100 days in office, Junior Finance Minister Namo Narain Meena said in a written statement to parliament in New Delhi on Aug. 4. Singh was sworn in on May 22.

The changes are important for protecting shareholders in India, said Andrew Foster, who oversees $2 billion in assets, including Indian securities, at Matthews International Capital Management LCC in San Francisco.

“Such a change is a welcome one,” Foster said in an e- mailed response to questions. “Ensuring a reasonable minimum float would help avoid share price manipulation, scams, abuse by majority shareholders, etc. So I think this would constitute a positive structural change.”

SMC – Name That Inspires Trust :)

If you find yourself asking the question –

Why should I Save ?

Why should I Invest ?

Where do I Invest ?

Who would Guide me to take informed decision on my Investments ?

…then look no further !

SMC Global, a leading Financial services provider in India, a vertically integrated investment solutions company, with a pan-india presence is there to guide you and provide complete investment solutions to you.

Currently, SMC has a highly efficient workforce of over 4,000 employees & one of the largest retail network in India currently serving the financial needs of more than 5,50,000 satisfied investors.

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