Archive for the ‘Asset management’ Category

Points to Remember while Selling Stocks – Part 2

Hello Friends here we come up with an extension of our previous blog, “Points to Remember while Selling Stocks Part 1”.

🙂

Points to Remember while Selling Stocks

Points to Remember while Selling Stocks

In previous Blog we had touched upon few points related to selling stock tips.

In this blog lets get to know more of valuable points in this regard.:)

Major points when to sell your stocks ( starting from 4th..three already being discussed in Blog 1)

4. Stock is Over Valued:

During bull market, high quality stocks appreciate value.

But more importantly, with so much hype around the stock, they are often set up for a fall.

Therefore, investor may use the strategy of selling them first and buy at lower price.

🙂

5. Need Some Cash-

Certain unexpected circumstances may affect the time when to sell stock.

It is not wrong to sell stock to solve your financial emergency, especially the underperforming one.

However, it is advisable to have some emergency cash funds.

After all, basic investing rules is to start investing if you have enough money.

🙂

6. A Change in Monetary Policy-

The Central Bank, RBI changes monetary policy if it perceives that inflation is heating up.

By raising interest rates, it contracts the money supply and slows down the financial system.

It is generally seen that stocks normally react negatively against the action, and some time markets become more volatile.

If you are not happy with this type of risk then you should move a portion of your portfolio into stocks that will not be as affected with such changes.

🙂

7. A Company Suddenly Cuts Dividends or Lower Income Estimates-

This event should be investigated carefully before making any judgment to sell.

For good reason, the board of directors might want to retain more of their earnings for internal growth, rather than paying them out in dividends.

Sell a company’s stock if the performance is down.

Investors must never sell the stock of a fine company if its price goes either ways significantly – up or down.

Falling earnings margins and slowing earnings must be treated as a warning signal.

Lastly, I would like to say that always do your homework (Research) well while selling a company’s stock; you can use either the top-down approach or the bottom-up approach.

Markets are often full of rumors. You cannot make money in the market by acting on market rumors.

Always listen to the stories, but remember you should do your own research–and do it thoroughly.

Make your buy or sell decision based on your analysis of the company, not on what others tell you to do.

🙂

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here

E-Filing of Service Tax to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

E-Filing of Service Tax Set to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

E-Filing of Service Tax Set to be Made Mandatory in Coming Months

The government will make electronic filing of service tax mandatory within a couple of months, said a senior official of the Central Board of Excise and Customs (CBEC).

“Electronic filing of service tax will be made compulsory in the next two months,” CBEC member Mr Y G Parande told reporters on the sidelines of a PHD chamber seminar.

Parande also expressed hope that despite impact of stimulus package on realisation of revenue, the government would meet service tax collection target during the financial year.

During the year, the government proposed to garner Rs 65,000 crore as service tax.

The service tax collection during the first seven months has dropped by 5.4 per cent to Rs 28,926 crore compared with corresponding period last year.

The collections of indirect tax, including customs, excise and service tax, fell by 21.6 per cent to Rs 1,26,903 crore during the period of April-October.

🙂

Attributing decline in revenue collections to incentives given by the government to help the economy combat the impact of global slowdown, Mr Parande said, “certainly, the stimulus packages have had the effect (on indirect tax collections), particularly because rates were brought down.”

Earlier, stimulus packages and economic slowdown have hit the exchequer hard as indirect tax collections shrunk by 21.6 per cent to Rs 1.27 lakh crore in the first seven months of this fiscal, against Rs 1.62 lakh crore a year ago.

All the three components of indirect tax — excise, customs and service tax — have registered decline in collections.

🙂

As stimulus is taking a heavy toll on the exchequer, talks have also already begun about when to withdraw it.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had said it will be phased out from next fiscal, while Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee had said it will continue till the global economy recovers.

🙂

Points to Remember while Selling Stocks – Part 1

Hello Friends here we come up with our another write up on “SMC Gyan Series”. 🙂


Points to remember while selling stock

Points to remember while selling stock

 

Buying a stock is simple, but Selling is actually harder as it requires regulation, understandable thoughts, and a tight rein on one’s emotions.

The ongoing optimism, slow economic revival, positive signs on the global front and high expectations from the stable government at home have forced bulls to give up their lethargic activities and to march northward.

Many investors who had seen the value of their stocks hit rock bottom and are now facing dilemma whether to sell or should they hold on? :O

Investors often face problems to take right decisions in volatile market as markets could head either way.

Wouldn’t it be disheartening if the markets rallied northwards, the day after you sold your stocks?

What if the markets come crashing down tomorrow, depriving you of the opportunity to enhance profits?

So, the decision to sell is critical.

🙂

Some of the points when to sell your stocks:

Prima facie, if there is any drastic change in fundamental of a company, this should be the only reason to sell stock.

But a depth research has to be done before taking any decision.

Changes includes;

-restructuring of its business model,

-different business focus and directions.

🙂

FIRST THREE POINTS :

1. Margins Crashed

Margins are the profit that a company makes on its sales.

Rising gross margins tell us that a company is reducing production costs or raising prices.

Conversely, deteriorating margins say either that production costs are increasing and the company can’t raise prices proportionally or that the company is cutting prices in an attempt to maintain marketshare.

If there are expenses related to a new product’s introduction then margins might fall for inoffensive reasons.

Falling margins, either gross or operating, often signal a declining competitive position. Thus it’s important to check both.

🙂

2.Is There Any Drastic Change In Company’s Management?

If people in top management of the company say director or president who are liable for a company’s success begin to go away, there might be a few negative implications for the future outlook of that company as an investor.

You must look into and find out the root cause and also to see how much it could impact you.

If negative prospects, investor should sell the stock and should relocate the funds into a similar company that has stronger and more constant management.

🙂

3. What First Fascinated You To The Stock, No Longer Applies

For example, let’s suppose that you bought a stock of a health care company because of its innovative products in the pharmaceutical field and all of a sudden, it loses a crucial patent for a life-saving medicine.

This may result in a decrease of market share in its industry, which might lead to a reduction in future profits (resulting in a decline in the value of its stock).

🙂

Stay Tuned for more on this where we would touch upon other major points needed to keep in mind by investors before making any Buy and sell decision.

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

Dividend Payout not the Best Criteria to Judge MFs Schemes

 

Mutual fund schemes generally boast about high dividends but mutual fund experts say picking a mutual fund scheme on the basis of its dividend payout may not be the best way to invest in the sector.

As per MF experts, comparing the quantum of dividends paid in short term is not the correct way to measure a fund’s performance.

The proportion of dividend depends on a number of factors, including the frequency of payouts over a certain period of time.

There are funds that have higher net asset value (NAVs) but lower dividends, while others have lower NAVs, higher dividends.

Moreover, many analysts believes that the consistency of dividend payout is important than the quantum of dividend.

Experts always insist investors to not to base their investment decision on the percentage of dividend paid in a short period.

Rather Investors should look for the track record of the fund in this regard over a longer period of time.

After the recent equity market bull-run, many equity funds have declared dividends up to 70 per cent.

So far in October, over a dozen of equity schemes have declared dividends.

Experts are of view that the quantum of dividend paid does not directly indicate the performance of the fund, especially in the short term.

Unlike equities, if a mutual fund scheme pays certain percentage of dividend, NAV of the scheme drops by the same proportion.
If investors go for dividend plans, they most probably miss the compounding opportunities over the long-term for short-term gains.

An Equity head of a mutual fund said “unlike debt funds, where the intention of an investor is to earn dividends on a regular basis, investors in equity funds,  do not always look for dividend”.

At times, the focus is more on capital appreciation.

Even Fund Managers of reputed firms have maintained quite often that they pay dividends every year irrespective of the market conditions and consistency have always been theirs primary concern not the quantum of dividend.

Record Fund Raising by India Inc,through QIPs, is on the Cards.

 

Record Fund Raising by India Inc,through QIPs, is on the Cards

Record Fund Raising by India Inc,through QIPs, is on the Cards

 

 

Indian companies are all set to  raise record fund through share sales to institutional investors in the next few months as they attempt to reduce debt accumulated during their takeovers.

Hindalco, Aban Offshore and Tech Mahindra, which bought the scandal-hit Satyam Computer, will lead this record fund raising by India Inc.

Indian companies have approvals from shareholders to raise as much as Rs 68,000 crore by selling shares to institutional investors under the so-called qualified institutional placement route.

This is in addition to around Rs 26,000 cr that has been raised by companies such as real estate developer Unitech and Suzlon Energy in the last six months, thanks to the signs of economic revival and  record stocks rally.

India Inc raised as much as Rs 26,430 cr in the last thirty-six QIP issues since March this year, according to the analysis.

These companies which raised funds in the last six months still have room to raise another Rs 23,000 cr based on the approvals shareholders have given them.

There are several companies which have received approval for QIPs between June and October with a potential to raise as much as Rs 44,000 crore, but are yet to hit the market.

Hindalco, which is saddled with debt after it acquired Canada’s Novellis, plans to raise Rs 2,900 crore and Tech Mahindra plans to raise to partly repay the loan it took to buy Satyam Computer.

Essar Oil which is negotiating to buy Shell’s refineries in the UK plans to raise around Rs 9,000 cr, whereas JSW Steel has a mandate raise Rs 4,853 cr.

Shareholders’ approval is valid for a year and most of these companies took approval after June this year.

“The issues that have come till now got strong interest from institutional investors, and predominantly from foreign buyers who bought over 90% of the QIP issues.  Given the current market conditions and the kind of interest that Investors displayed in the Indian growth story, the proposed issues should be subscribed successfully,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, equity head, SMC Capitals.

The fund raising gets bigger when one takes into account the potential IPOs and government share sales which may run into billions of dollars more.

🙂

 

PORTFOLIO REBALANCING TO STAY ON TRACK

Portfolio re balancing is the process of bringing the different asset classes back into appropriate proportion following a significant change in one or more.
PORTFOLIO REBALANCING TO STAY ON TRACK
Over the time, as different asset classes produce different returns, the portfolio’s asset allocation changes. To recapture the portfolio’s original risk and return characteristics, the portfolio must be rebalanced to its original asset allocation.

The primary purpose of rebalancing is to maintain a consistent risk profile. Periodic rebalancing will help to avoid counterproductive temptations in the market.

For example, in this seemingly falling market, rather than an investor

Tempted to follow the crowd, who are busy dumping popular stocks; the imbalance created by erosion of the equity component can be used to book profits on debt portion and buy into equities to bring back the allocation to the original ratio.

The balancing act

To get the entire asset classes back to their original allocation percentages would entail the following:

·Selling part of the equities and investing the proceeds into debt and cash and vis-a-versa.

·Putting in fresh one-time investments into debt and cash to raise the allocation in the portfolio.

·Start a systematic investment plan skewed towards debt and cash.

Rebalancing controls risk

The investments in a portfolio will perform according to the market. As time goes on, a portfolio’s current asset allocation can move away from an investor’s original target asset allocation.

If left un-adjusted, the portfolio could either become too risky, or too conservative.

The goal of rebalancing is to move the current asset allocation back in line to the originally planned asset allocation.

How often should one rebalance?

Though the frequency is entirely dependent on the investor, the portfolio size as well as market conditions will impact the overall returns’ expectation of the portfolio.

The main idea is that the periodic interval between successive rebalancing acts should be constant.

Some of the other factors affecting the rebalancing are:

Cost of transactions

If one decides to rebalance the portfolio once in six months, he needs to factor in short term capital gains, brokerages and entry exit loads. Hence, it is advisable to rebalance annually the long term portfolios and rebalance semi annually for the short term portfolios.

Volatility

High return volatility increases the fluctuation of the asset class weights around the target allocation and increases the risk of significant deviation from the target.

Greater volatility implies a greater need to rebalance. In the presence of time-varying volatility, rebalancing occurs more often when volatility rises.

Investors can also employ another trigger for asset rebalancing. They can decide to rebalance their portfolio, not according to time, but rather only when any asset class changes in allocation due to market movements, over a certain percentage.

Conclusion

Portfolio rebalancing is an important part of sticking to your game plan. You should look at your portfolio at least quarterly in terms of rebalancing and more frequently if you have had a significant gain or loss in any asset class.

At last asset rebalancing is a very important exercise for any disciplined investor who wishes to approach their investing in a systematic manner, while realizing their financial goals that they have set out to achieve.

Portfolio rebalancing is the process of bringing the different asset classes back into appropriate proportion following a significant change in one or more. Over the time, as different asset classes produce different returns, the portfolio’s asset allocation changes.

To recapture the portfolio’s original risk and return characteristics, the portfolio must be rebalanced to its original asset allocation.

The primary purpose of rebalancing is to maintain a consistent risk profile. Periodic rebalancing will help to avoid counterproductive temptations in the market. For example, in this seemingly falling market, rather than an investor tempted to follow the crowd, who are busy dumping popular stocks, the imbalance created by erosion of the equity component can be used to book profits on debt portion and buy into equities to bring back the allocation to the original ratio.

RBI’s Monetary Policy – Analyst View

Hello Friends, last month we witnessed loads of action with the RBI’s monetary policy being laid down.

Just an extension of our previous blog “RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance – Part 3.

 

 

Analyst View RBI policy

RBI Monetary Policies and Projections Part 4

 


In this Blog we would read the Analyst views with respect to the monetary point of view.

Analysis from the Analyst from monetary point of view:

Though there is a hike in SLR to 25 % but we think it will not have much more impact because the total investment book of commercial banks is already at 30.4% of total NDTL.

Although key rates of CRR, reverse repo and repo rates have been left unchanged, special repo facilities have been withdrawn.

Real estate loans provisioning are set to become more expensive.

NPA norms for banks have been tightened while liabilities of scheduled banks arising from transactions in CBLO with Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) will be subject to maintenance of CRR.

🙂

The RBI is thus attempting to withdraw liquidity from areas where excess liquidity had reached a point it was more than comfortable with, while also targeting better quality management of credit.

Another point is that in the policy stance, RBI has given first priority to keep a vigil on trends in inflation and to be prepared to respond swiftly and effectively through policy adjustments to stabilize inflation expectations.

Second, it will monitor the liquidity situation closely and manage it actively to ensure that credit demands of productive sectors are adequately met while also securing price stability and financial stability.

Lastly, RBI will maintain a monetary and interest rate regime consistent with price stability and financial stability, and supportive of the growth process.

🙂

In conclusion, it bears emphasis that the Reserve Bank is mindful of its fundamental commitment to price stability.

It will continue to monitor the price situation in its entirety and will take measures as warranted by the evolving macroeconomic conditions swiftly and effectively.

🙂

To conclude all the factors it seems that with the withdrawal of special liquidity measures together with an imposition of CRR in borrowing in CBLO market, RBI has taken a first to step towards controlling liquidity.

 

With prioritizing inflation it is expected that the next step of RBI could hike in CRR as it has also reduced the indicative growth of Broad money to 17% from 18%.

🙂

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here


Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian Stocks Rose After Govt Approved Disinvestment Plans

Indian stocks rose, extending the benchmark index’s longest string of gains in five weeks, after the government approved a plan to sell more shares in state- controlled companies, helping it raise funds to boost spending.

MMTC Ltd., India’s biggest state-owned trading company, surged 20 percent, the most in 10 months.

Rico Auto Industries Ltd., an auto component maker that supplies General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co., climbed 5.1 percent after workers ended a 45-day strike.

🙂

The Bombay Stock Exchange’s Sensitive Index, or Sensex, rose 94.38, or 0.6 percent, to 16,158.28.
The measure this week gained 1.7 percent, snapping two weeks of losses.

The S&P CNX Nifty Index on the National Stock Exchange rose 0.6 percent to 4,796.15.
The BSE 200 Index added 1.1 percent to 2,011.08.

🙂

“The disinvestment move will help moderate India’s fiscal deficit,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of equities at SMC Capitals Ltd. in New Delhi.

“Also, it may help in higher GDP growth led by increased government spending.”

🙂

MMTC soared 20 percent to 36,146.85 rupees, the most since Dec. 17.
State Trading Corp., the No. 2, leapt 15 percent to 353.6 rupees.

NMDC Ltd., India’s largest iron-ore producer, climbed 10 percent to 338 rupees. 

Hindustan Copper Ltd., India’s biggest copper miner, 99.59 percent state-owned, gained 10 percent to 256.35 rupees.

🙂

Budget Deficit

The government owns 99.33 percent in MMTC and 91.02 percent in State Trading, while it holds 98.38 percent in NMDC, according to filings to the Bombay Stock Exchange.

The government will use the money raised from the sale of shares of state companies for social spending.

India’s fiscal deficit reached 6 percent of gross domestic product in the year ended March 31, surpassing the 2.5 percent government target.

The key Sensitive stock index has more than doubled from this year’s lowest level, in March.

Govt’s stand to sell state assets and accept more overseas funds into insurance and banking, has strengthened, after Prime Minister Manmohan Singh resounding re-election victory in May.

🙂


RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance – Part 3

Just an extension of our previous blog “RBI, Monetary Projections And Indian Economy


RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance - Part 3

RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance - Part 3

In this Blog we would touch upon the aspects as that of RBI’s Monetary Policy Stance and few more facts which carries direct or indirect connection with the RBI Policies.

🙂

For example, business confidence index ,industrial recovery status, overall consumption and investment, export-imports status etc;

The True Facts:

So far business confidence has also improved, and demand conditions seem to have picked up, as seen by better order book and increased capital finance requirements.

Industrial recovery seems to be on its way with 5.8% growth in IIP during April-August ’09.

A revival in capital flows, and stronger performance of the core infrastructure sector (4.8% for April-August ’09) seems to be indicating a slight recovery in the economy.

However, there has been a deceleration in growth of private consumption and investment demand, and raw material prices are expected to rise on account of inflationary pressures.

The deficient monsoon could also reduce rural demand.

First quarter earnings of corporates reflect a decline in sales, and non-food credit growth has decelerated, with credit card and consumer durables related credit turning negative.

Exports have continued to decline as external demand dependent services remain sluggish.

The economy is showing some signs of recovery, while a rising CPI has now pushed WPI into the positive territory, mainly on account of higher food prices.

The RBI’s stance will thus have to manage the trade-off inflationary pressures between supporting growth and controlling .

🙂

Monetary Policy Stance

On the basis of the above overall assessment, the stance of monetary policy for the remaining period of 2009-10 will be as follows:

– Keep a vigil on the trends in inflation and be prepared to respond swiftly and effectively through policy adjustments to stabilize inflation expectations.

Monitor the liquidity situation closely and manage it actively to ensure that credit demands of productive sectors are adequately met while also securing price stability and financial stability.

-Maintain a monetary and interest rate regime consistent with price stability and financial stability, and supportive of the growth process.

🙂

Stay Tuned for more on the topic.

We would cover Analysis view from the Analyst with respect to the monetary point of view.

Note : For More Finance Gyan, Latest Industry, Stock Market, Economy News and Updates, please click here

RBI to Assess Affairs of Foreign Banks Operating in India

RBI to Assess Affairs of Foreign Banks Operating in India

RBI to Assess Affairs of Foreign Banks Operating in India

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) decided to run a detailed assessment of the risk-management capabilities and evaluate the transparency in financial affairs of all foreign banks operating in India with an aim to ensure that they do not pose any systemic risk to the banking sector.

🙂

However, until this process is finished, foreign banks are doubtful to be permitted to open more branches in India while India has committed to allowing 12 new branches to foreign banks in a year, but has been more liberal.


Moreover, this has resulted in a high presence of foreign banks in India as their WTO commitment allows them to deny licenses to foreign banks once their share in the total assets of the banking system exceeds 15%.


Additionally, as it comes in the aftermath of the financial crisis, the audit reflects concerns over an unduly large presence of foreign banks creating risks for Indian financial markets.


Meanwhile, the finance ministry and the central bank had always supported allowing foreign banks to operate in India as they thought that increased presence of foreign banks boosts the efficiency of the domestic banking sector.